Guest Post: The Bundles of Joy That Bind You

Mommy, Esq lives in the Boston area (where the winters try their best to get her to move South) with six month old Ned and Penny, and her husband of six years. She is a corporate lawyer by trade, but would love to attempt being a wedding photographer. She says “I love taking photographs and doing storybook photographing – which is why blogging is perfect for me!”

Spending time with my sister and her daughter last week brought back some memories of our newborn days. I can’t say it brought back many memories because frankly I don’t remember a lot – and that is probably for the best. Having a newborn (or two or more) is hard on your marriage. Usually when I cried – which was not that often thankfully – it was about my husband. Husband and I have found a good groove now that I am back at work and things feel more equal. But those early days were all about what I had to do and how I wasn’t feeling supported or appreciated or understood. Here are a few lessons that I have learned along the way…

 1. Roadmap. There is no roadmap for new moms – no matter how hard you know breastfeeding will be, how many classes on childcare you take or even if you have hired a baby nurse (as we did) it is The Mommy who is in charge. The Mommy is expected to know everything – how to change a diaper and sooth a cranky baby. How much and when to feed The Baby. When The Baby needs to sleep. If The Mommy is stubborn (ahem) the road the newly created family travels will be that much harder.

2. Mindreading. Husbands can’t read minds. But The Mommy is expected to know everything so why can’t The Husband be expected to read The Mommy’s mind? Can’t The Husband understand the nuances of when The Mommy is about to break-down because dammit The Mommy didn’t want him just to swaddle The Baby she wanted him to hold The Baby and make The Baby STOP CRYING. Or just sit next to The Mommy and talk about how wonderful the kids are while The Mommy breastfeed even if The Husband hates the HGTV/SoapNet show she is watching. Communication is really hard when you are sleep deprived, when you are burning more calories breastfeeding than a marathon runner and when your mind is consumed by details of poop and last feeding times.

3. Changing Roles. The Mommy was (just) a Lawyer, Wife or some such person 10 minutess before the baby(ies) popped out. Now The Mommy is supposed to be 100% about her kid(s). See #1 – where is the instruction manual? How come The Husband can complain about being sleep deprived when he is only getting up once a night (or not at all)? Suddenly The Mommy is supposed to cook dinner when it used to be all take out; do the laundry when it was a 50-50 job in the past? The Mommy does NOT = Housewife. The Husband shouldn’t be worrying about paying bills or opening mail or anything not 100% baby-related when he is home with The Mommy – that can wait until The Baby is asleep.

4. Worst Time of Day. The Mommy will be calling Husband every 10 mins after 4 pm asking when he is going to come home. Because the time from 4 pm to bedtime is a Soul Sucking couple of hours. And if you are pumping and breastfeeding (or trying to) it is even worse because you are so exhausted from the life being sucked out of you. If someone else tells The Mommy she should be sleeping when the babies do she will probably kill them.

5. Learning to Accept Help. Husband and I were rockstars in the hospital. The nurses told me that they never worried about us – I seemed so together and strong despite a C-Section. The kids roomed in and we did it all with a cheery waive to the nurses – “all under control, thanks!” My sister was smarter – she sent Cameron to the nursery because after all, Cameron wouldn’t be rooming in when they brought her home. Damn, good call. Stacey though can’t let go of the cleaning/picking up of the house. Husband had already trained me in that department. Sort of like #2 it took a while before I was willing to accept help – even from the baby nurse we were paying! Stupid stubbornness. The Mommy needs to be in control and make all the right choices. I found it easier to limit the interactions with the wider world to once or twice a week so I could appear completely in control during those times and let myself be crazy the rest of the time.

6. Nothing Stays the Same. The Husband always complains to The Mommy: “Why do you keep changing things?” See #1 – The Mommy has no idea what she is doing. The baby changes every day. The Mommy will try out a multitude of routines before she “picks” one that will last for about 2 days. This was so hard on Husband. I think he loves that the kids have been on the same routine for more than 2 months now. Hmmm…that must mean it is time to shake things up. This walk down memory lane hasn’t dampened my desire to have another child but it does remind me how friggin’ hard the first kid(s) are on a marriage. I would like to think I would handle things better the next time around but frankly I don’t think I will remember enough so we’ll be back at #1 reinventing the wheel. The Husband will probably helpfully ask at multiple intervals: “Is this what we did for The First Baby(ies)?”

What was the hardest thing in your relationship with your partner when you brought home your bundle(s) of joy?
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Read other HDYDI posts on marriage and multiples:

The State of the Union

Absence

The Man in Your Bed

6 thoughts on “Guest Post: The Bundles of Joy That Bind You

  1. Thanks for this post! So very true and real. I can completely relate to #1 and all the issues that stem from this “mommy should know everything” phenomenon!

    The fact that everyone around me (hubby included) assumes I understand the babies and know what to do about them- both baffles me and seriously stresses me out. Most of the time I just experiment until the crying stops and let’s be honest anyone could do that!

  2. Wow! Thanks for this post. You TOTALLY summed up how it was for me. I feel exactly the same way – much as dealing with two brand new babies (what to do??!!), the hardest part was (I sa

  3. - sorry, hit ‘sent’ by mistake -
    (I say WAS, b/c at 14 months things have definitely gotten better – although I STILL get, ‘why is he crying like that???’, which during bad moments I just scream, ‘I DON’T KNOW!’). Anyway, the hardest part was how things changed between DH and I.
    I agree, the two most annoying were 1. – see above, and 2. ‘I’m so tired’ or ‘It’s SO hard’ – spoken when I left him with them for an HOUR when I was/am home alone with them all friggin’ day! 3. I would go ballistic when he arrived even 15 minutes later than when he said he would. I mean I would COUNT the seconds on some days in the begining. Reinforcements!!!
    Thanks for letting me vent.
    It does get better, but sometimes I just think it’s b/c he’s enjoying the boys more!

  4. #4 kicked my ass.

    If I had help she had usually gone home by then and my husband wasn’t home from work yet.

    I often cried from 4:00 to 4:30.

    I wish that was a joke, but it is true.

    It is so much easier now that they are almost 5. It has been gradual, but (so far) it just keeps getting easier.

    I imagine things will change when the teenage hormones start to kick in.

  5. Love the line about the Mommy does NOT = Housewife, and the bit about how the husband is not to worry about paying bills or opening mail, etc. when there are babies around. That keeps happening at our house 14 months along. One of these days he’ll get it!

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