Guest Post: Separating Twins at School by Dr. Nancy Segal

Today’s guest post comes from Dr. Nancy Segal, the director of the Twin Studies Center at Cal State, Fullerton.

Nancy L. Segal, Ph.D.
California State University, Fullerton
nsegal@fullerton.edu
drnancysegaltwins.org

The biggest dilemma regarding twins seems to surround the arguments for and against separating them at school. There is no simple answer to this question, but I strongly urge that there be no policy one way or the other. That is, each twin pair should be evaluated separately, taking their particular needs into consideration. I am, therefore, very much against mandatory separation of twins, a policy that is upheld strictly in some school districts.

Some schools maintain that twins will not grow up to be independent individuals if placed in the same room as their twin brother or sister. This is, however, not a research-based practice. It is known that when friends go off to school together for the first time they are more comfortable in their new situation, more interactive with other children and less likely to cling to their teacher. Interestingly, no one worries that two such children might not become separate, independent individuals!

Going to school for the first time can be a little daunting for some children, and forcing twins to separate from their parent and from their twin at the same time may be a lot to ask in some cases. A solution is for teachers to arrange for separate tables within the same classroom so that twins can see each other (that is often the only thing they need!), but develop separate friendships. I once tracked twins during recess and found that while identical were together more often than fraternals they were not together all the time. Often, just a glance at the twin was enough to make them feel relaxed and happy.

We also need to be mindful of twin types. Identical twins are in a very different situation than fraternal same-sex twins who, in turn, are in a different situation from opposite-sex twins. Identical twins may be confused by their classmates and teachers, due to their matched appearance. If identical twins are placed together parents should have them wear different outfits or hair styles, or even wear name tags! It is important that people learn their names and address them as such. Fraternal twins (both same-sex and opposite-sex) will probably not be confused—although some people may forget which name goes with which twin in the case of the same-sex pairs. Same-sex fraternal twins will generally have different interests and abilities and may benefit from separate classrooms in some cases. Male-female twins may benefit from separation for other reasons—little girls mature ahead of little boys socially, intellectually ands physically. Girls in these pairs tend to mother their brothers, behavior that may not always be beneficial for the boys. Above all, however, all decisions regarding school placement for twins should be rendered on a case-by-case basis and evaluated periodically by parents and teachers working together. Young pairs, regardless of twin type, may benefit from being together during the early school years.

A word of additional caution: I have worked on cases of older identical twins who have been falsely accused of cheating on exams and projects because they produce similar scores and essays. If identical twins are in the same classroom, they should never sit together while taking tests!

Separating Twins at School

For more information about all sorts of twin-related subjects, please visit my website at drnancysegaltwins.org.

6 thoughts on “Guest Post: Separating Twins at School by Dr. Nancy Segal

  1. Thank you for this post. I think a case-by-case basis is best and also would encourage moms to be advocates for their twins – strict policies do get changed sometimes.

  2. We always assumed that our twins would be together. They’ve been in the same class in daycare and have very independent relationships and identities. Our surprise was that we (and our twins’ teachers) are noting that our twin son is very advanced for his age some developmental milestones. We are not into testing, but thinking at this point it would be better to know and make an informed decision than not. advice?

    • I personally find that information is helpful. It may not impact your decision, but it’ll save you from the agony of “what-if.”

  3. Pingback: From the Archives: Back to School | How Do You Do It?

  4. I HAVE TWIN IDENTICAL GIRLS AGE8, THEY SEPERATED THEM IN SCHOOL AND I HATE IT THEY HATE IT. WE ARE ALL UPSET AS A FAMILY AND ITS CAUSING PROBLEMS BETWEEN ME AND MY HUSBAND. WHY ARE MY TWINS COMPARED TO OTHER TWINS IN SCHOOL WHO EXCEPT IT. EVEN THE SCHOOL TRIP NEXT WEEK THEY HAVE SEPERATED THEM. SO THEY ARE NOT GOING! WHY ARE THEY PULLED APART, LET THEM DECIDE WHEN THEY ARE READY.

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