How the Twin Relationship is Like a Marriage

Posted on
Categories From the Mouths of Multiples, PerspectiveTags

My daughter, J, was sitting in the bathtub this morning when she said to me, “Sometimes, I think M knows more about me than I do.” (We have the best bathtime conversations. Seriously.)

“I used to feel that way about Daddy,” I responded. (While I’m not one to seek pity for my divorce, I do want my kids to remember good things or at least have a positive attitude towards the marriage.)

“But not any more,” she retorted, “because now you’re dee-vorced.”

“This is true, pumpkin. My point is that you’re probably right. There are probably some things about yourself that M genuinely understands better than you do.”

This wasn’t the first time J and I have been struck by the parallels between her relationship with her twin and my former relationship with their dad. When she was 3, she asked me whether M was her wife. When she was 2.5, she proposed that I was Daddy’s sister.

From MyHealth.Alber​ta.ca
From MyHealth.Alber​ta.ca
Photo Credit: 96dpi
Photo Credit: 96dpi

My daughters fall on the twinnier end of the twinniness continuum. (Yes, I just made up the term “twinniness continuum”.)

twinniness

At this end of the continuum, the twin relationship can look a lot like a marriage. To start, husbands and wives share a room, as do many twins; this was the source of my daughters’ youthful confusion. They make decisions together and must constantly compromise. They share resources. They may pursue other deeply meaningful relationships, but the husband/wife or twin/twin one comes first.

I once had a stranger tell me that the secret to saving her marriage was to stop expecting her husband to be her twin. The relationships and expectations are similar, but not identical.

Have you observed any similarities between your marriage and your twins’ relationship?

Sadia (rhymes with Nadia) has been coordinating How Do You Do It? since late 2012. She is the divorced mother of 7-year-old monozygotic twins, M and J. She lives with them and their 3 cats in the Austin, TX suburbs and works full time as a business analyst. She retired her personal blog, Double the Fun, when the girls entered elementary school and also blogs at Adoption.com and Multicultural Mothering.

Share this...Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on Tumblr0Share on Reddit0Digg thisShare on LinkedIn0Email this to someone

Published by

Sadia

Sadia (rhymes with Nadia) has been coordinating How Do You Do It? since late 2012. She is the divorced mother of 10-year-old monozygotic twins, M and J. They live in the Austin, TX suburbs, where Sadia works full time in information technology. She contributes to a number of parenting websites and magazines and also runs The Mommy Blogging Guide, where she answers mommy bloggers' technical questions.

2 thoughts on “How the Twin Relationship is Like a Marriage”

  1. I am so interested to see how the personalities of my b/g twins work together, because they seem so different in utero! My grandfather was an identical twin. He and his twin brother were more than best friends. They were closer in many ways with each other than they were with their spouses. My grandfather passed away at the age of 87, and his twin passed away just 6 months later. Up until the day my papa died, they talked multiple times every day. It was truly inspiring to see their amazing relationship. I hope my son and daughter can have a portion of that love for each other!

  2. Maher mentioned something similar about our b/g twins just yesterday. They are interdependent, sleep in the same mattress, are in the same class,, and even often play mama and papa. I am not too worried because I can see that as they grow older they will find more activities separately from each other. Different friends too. Glad for the friendship and sense of each other that they do share.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge