Kid-Friendly Kitchen Storage

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American kitchens vary wildly in their storage options, but I think it’s pretty standard to store silverware in drawers, pots and pans in lower cupboards, and dishes and cups in high cupboards.

My kitchen turns this approach on its head in the interest of being child-friendly, rather than child-proof. Our plates, cups, and food storage are all within easy reach of the children. Many of the pots and pans are up and out of the way.

 

I chose to keep the dishes within reach to make it easier for the children to lay the table and help put the dishes away. In fact, I have moved dinner plates, bowls, silverware and storage containers to the buffet in the dining room. It’s right next to, but not in, the kitchen.

Initially, I only kept unbreakable dishes conveniently placed for the children, but as they’ve grown older, they have taken on more responsibility. They’re not always the ones to lay the table or empty the dishwasher, but there’s no physical barrier to keep them to doing those tasks.

Perhaps it’s because I’m so short myself, but I rather like having the dishes down low. It’s more convenient for me too!

Twinkly Tuesday – June 30, 2015

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Skip to Tuesday Twinklers | Skip to rules | Skip to participant badge | Skip to this week’s links

Welcome to this week’s Twinkly Tuesday, the link party hosted by Sadia here at HDYDI, Caro of The Twinkle Diaries and Lisa at Mummascribbles.

Meet new people, share your posts, and read blogs you might never come across elsewhere. Twinkly Tuesday participants are generous commenters and talented writers.

Each week Lisa, Caro, and I choose a favourite post. If you have been featured, be sure to claim your fame by adding the Twinkly Tuesday Twinkler badge to your blog.

My Tuesday Twinkler for the week is from Maybe Baby Brothers and Me. Haidee wrote a post I wish I’d been able to read when I was a brand new mother titled “The Myth of Love at First Sight“. The fact is that not all mothers are overwhelmed by a rush of adoration and maternal instinct at the first sight of their babies. Some of us don’t even get to see our babies for hours or days. And whatever we feel usually falls within the realm of normal, even if the only ones who talk about it are usually in the love-at-first-sight camp.

The myth of love at first sight. It's okay and normal for maternal love to come gradually.

Lisa’s Tuesday Twinkler this week is from Motherhood: The Real Deal. Talya published an interview with an anonymous single mother friend about the realities of single motherhood. As you might imagine, this post really resonated with me. Reading the post made me realize that I just passed the 3 year anniversary of being legally single, although I was single parenting for quite some time prior to my divorce.

Mother holding her toddler son - what single motherhood is really like

Caro’s Tuesday Twinkler is from Glimmer of Hope. Merlinda wrote an exquisite piece to her son on his fifth birthday. She talks about the heartbreak of being separated from him immediately after birth, the challenges of toddlerhood, and the magic of becoming a schoolboy.

5 years - A mother looks back on the heartbreaks and joy of the first 5 years of motherhood.

Take a moment to visit these posts, if you can. We would love it if you paid a visit to the other host links, and any others that look interesting.

On with this week’s link-up!

Link two posts, old or new, that you think deserve more readers!

Twitter: Be sure to mention me — @hdydi or Caro — @twinklediaries, on Twitter and please use the hashtag #TwinklyTuesday. We’ll be sure to retweet every tweet tagged!

We’ll also visit everyone’s posts and leave comments between us.

Pinterest:  Lisa and I pin every post with an image to the primary Twinkly Tuesday Pinterest board and I repin the top pins on the HDYDI Twinkly Tuesday board. Send an email to mummascribbles@hotmail.com or tweet Lisa your email address and she’ll add you to the primary board. No more than 2 posts per week please!

Each week, all three of us pick our favourite posts which will be featured on the following week’s Twinkly Tuesday page.

There are a few easy rules to follow, to ensure that everyone’s posts get the attention they deserve. Please do make the effort to abide by the rules, in fairness to the vast majority who do. We have been forced to block participation for repeat offenders who haven’t responded to multiple reminders.

  • Link up to two posts per week — old or new.
  • Please be kind enough to add our badge to the bottom of your post/s. (Scroll down for the code.) If you haven’t (yet) been featured, please make sure you’re using this badge and not the featured one.
  • Please comment on at least two other posts including the one directly before yours. Visit and comment on as many others as you can. Of course, checking out the hosts’ posts would make us feel very loved.
  • Please use #TwinklyTuesday in your comments so people know where you found them!
  • By linking up, you give us permission to use images from your blog if featured. You also allow us to add you to a mailing list to receive a weekly announcement when Twinkly Tuesday opens.
  • The linky will close at 23.55 GMT on Friday.

We look forward to reading all of your fantastic blog posts and seeing you again next week! Remember to grab our button!

Grab button for Twinkly Tuesday

Here’s how to add our badge to your site. Enter HTML editing mode on your post, sidebar, or page. Copy the code in the box below and paste it into your site in your code/html view. Save and publish. That’s it!

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Early Readers: Children’s Books Based on Movies

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My daughters, now aged 9, are fluent readers, several years ahead of where they need to be. Their elementary school librarian regularly requests books from the local high school library, since her shelves are targeted at less fluent readers than M and J.

Going through my old videos, I found this gem, taken when J was 4 years old. Yes, at that age both M and J wore butterfly wings more often than not. Seeing J’s hard work reminded me that, although reading came extremely easily to both my daughters, it took work and patience. In the video, J is reading a book based on the Disney movie Chicken Little.

I’m generally leery of using television as an educational tool for young children. However, one way to tempt a new reader is to offer him or her a book based on a film they know and love. Disney Little Golden Books are a great resource for this approach.

5 years later, J and M watched the first Percy Jackson movie, only to be appalled by the liberties taken by the producers. J pointed out error after error compared to the book by her favourite author, Rick Riordan. I agreed with her that I found film versions of my favourite books to be disappointments. I smiled inside about being able to share a love of literature with both my daughters.

What books got your kids over the hump of needing to spell things out?

12 Bizarre Comments About Identical Twins

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Categories humor, Identical, Other peopleTags , 29 Comments

We twin mothers love to trade notes on the odd and ignorant comments and questions we get from strangers. Most of the time, we’re given an opportunity to educate and for people to coo over our little ones. Standard questions include “Are they natural?” and “Can you tell them apart?”.

I’m used to those questions. Then, there are these questions. The comments I’m sharing here came from a completely different place. These questions didn’t come from ignorance or curiosity.

They came from Cuckooland.

  1. What are they mixed? It turns out that the person asking this oddly phrased question wanted to know about my daughters’ ancestry/racial makeup. The comment-maker was herself biracial and was curious about my triracial girls. They are half Bengali (South Asian/Indian/choose your term), quarter Mexican (Hispanic/Native North American/Spanish) and quarter Caucasian (Scottish/Irish/French). I prefer the terms “people”, “children”, and “American”. “Twin-American” if you insist on hyphenation.sadia2toddlercarry
  2. How could you not rhyme their names? This question was posed to me by a mother of boy/girl twins whose daughter was in the same jazz dance class as my daughters. I am rarely left speechless, but she managed it. I came back with some weak answer about not wanting to echo the plight of the monozygotic twins in our family named Janice and Janet."How could you not rhyme their names?" asks one mother of twins to another. And other odd questions.
  3. Why do you dress them alike? Granted, this is less cuckoo than the other questions on this list, but the assumption that there could only be one way to do things drives me batty. When they were babies, it was because we were given so many matching outfits at our baby showers. And because it’s adorable. Once they per past age one, it was because M and J had opinions of their own.Twins in coordinating outfits are adorable! And twins in uncoordinated outfits? Equally adorable...
  4. Why don’t you dress them alike? I’ve actually gotten this question on the very same day as Number 10. When they were babies, it was because it was way too much hassle to keep them coordinated. Also, J tended to want to be cooler than M, so she wore fewer layers. Once they were past age one, it was because J and M had opinions of their own.J and M didn't care to dress alike on this particular day. They get to have a say in the matter. From hdydi.com
  5. Which one’s the good one? I still don’t have a witty comeback for this one. Interestingly, I’ve only ever received this question from males.Twins in the real world do not come in "good" and "evil" flavours.
  6. Which is the original? Which one is the clone? Oh my. I wish I had a couple of hours to sit down with this guy and give him some basic lessons in fetal development. And manners. Sadly, I didn’t have the time, so I just said, “That’s not how twins work. If you cut an apple in half, there isn’t an original side and a copy side. Each is a full half in its own right.” This wasn’t the best metaphor to use, but it was what I could think of while holding two crying babies and checking out of the grocery store with apple-pear-sauce ingredients.Identical twins no more consistent of  an "original" and a "copy" than halves of an apple.
  7. Do they have different personalities? I tried to imagine the internal world of this person. They must imagine identical twins all over the world walking around in lockstep and speaking at the same time.Some people have some odd assumptions about twins.
  8. Do they have different names? I’m not George Foreman. Unlike Mr. Foreman, most twin parents do not give their children the same name.
  9. If I pinch one, does the other feel it? No. Just no.
  10. Do they have ESP? I mustered up my creepiest stare.These are not the twins with ESP you are looking for.
  11. Were you pregnant for 18 months? I felt bad for this girl. She seemed to be college aged, but may have been younger. Her question was so genuine and her affection for the babies so honest, I didn’t have the heart for snark. I just told her that no, the babies started growing at the same time and grew at the same rate as regular ones, so I just got really big. I didn’t think she could handle any information about prematurity while she processed that.Sadia and her husband, while expecting. From M and J's Birth Story from hdydi.com
  12. They are not identical. They’re wearing different colours. Here’s how I usually handle this type of comment. In this case, I just said, “‘Identical’ is more about how twins grew in the womb than how they look.” Sometimes, you have to pick your battles.Identical twins can wear different clothes. However, some people out and about will be very confused by this. The oddest questions faced by a mom of twins.

What’s the most oddball question or comment you’ve received so far?

Twinkly Tuesday – June 23, 2015

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Categories Parenting Link Up, Twinkly Tuesday4 Comments

Skip to Tuesday Twinklers | Skip to rules | Skip to participant badge | Skip to this week’s links

Welcome to this week’s Twinkly Tuesday, the link party hosted by Sadia here at HDYDI, Caro of The Twinkle Diaries and Lisa at Mummascribbles.

Meet new people, share your posts, and read blogs you might never come across elsewhere. Twinkly Tuesday participants are generous commenters and talented writers.

Lisa, Caro, and I all feel very strongly that at least one of us should read and leave a thoughtful comment on each Twinkly Tuesday post. Last week, we had 180 links, which is amazing, extraordinary, and, frankly, overwhelming. We’re seeking your thoughts on how to rein things in so that we don’t lose the intimate, thoughtful nature of Twinkly Tuesday. Please weigh in on our survey.

Twinkly Tuesday size survey

Each week Lisa, Caro, and I choose a favourite post. If you have been featured, be sure to claim your fame by adding the Twinkly Tuesday Twinkler badge to your blog.

My Tuesday Twinkler for the week is from occupation: (m)other. Lucy talked about the message sent to our children by the admittedly adorable party theme of Pirates and Princesses. The post is filled with insights and beautiful prose like this: “I do recognise that there are differences between the sexes. It’s the lazy gender positioning of this dressing up day in ones so young that really bothers me.”

Why pirates and princesses? Why not one day for a pirate theme and another day for royalty or fairytales? What do our kids learn about their place in the world from events like these?

Lisa’s Tuesday Twinkler this week is from The Gifted Gabber. Amy put into words a feeling that I’ve always had, that daycare doesn’t damage our children. In fact, daycare teachers serve more as co-parents, experienced, trained, creative, and willing co-parents. 

Day care teachers can serve as another parent to our children.

Caro’s Tuesday Twinkler is from Pirates and Dollies. No, she and I did not collude to present you with an exercise in irony this week with the titles of our picks. Kirby wrote a heartbreaking piece titled “Can You See Me?” about how it feels when a marriage loses its spark, when partnership and passion are only a memory.

Can you see me? A heartbreaking letter from a wife who feels invisible in her marriage.

Take a moment to visit these posts, if you can. We would love it if you paid a visit to the other host links, and any others that look interesting.

On with this week’s link-up!

Link two posts, old or new, that you think deserve more readers!

Twitter: Be sure to mention me — @hdydi or Caro — @twinklediaries, on Twitter and please use the hashtag #TwinklyTuesday. We’ll be sure to retweet every tweet tagged!

We’ll also visit everyone’s posts and leave comments between us.

Pinterest:  Lisa and I pin every post with an image to the primary Twinkly Tuesday Pinterest board and I repin the top pins on the HDYDI Twinkly Tuesday board. Send an email to mummascribbles@hotmail.com or tweet Lisa your email address and she’ll add you to the primary board. No more than 2 posts per week please!

Each week, all three of us pick our favourite posts which will be featured on the following week’s Twinkly Tuesday page.

There are a few easy rules to follow, to ensure that everyone’s posts get the attention they deserve. Please do make the effort to abide by the rules, in fairness to the vast majority who do. We have been forced to block participation for repeat offenders who haven’t responded to multiple reminders.

  • Link up to two posts per week — old or new.
  • Please be kind enough to add our badge to the bottom of your post/s. (Scroll down for the code.) If you haven’t (yet) been featured, please make sure you’re using this badge and not the featured one.
  • Please comment on at least two other posts including the one directly before yours. Visit and comment on as many others as you can. Of course, checking out the hosts’ posts would make us feel very loved.
  • Please use #TwinklyTuesday in your comments so people know where you found them!
  • By linking up, you give us permission to use images from your blog if featured. You also allow us to add you to a mailing list to receive a weekly announcement when Twinkly Tuesday opens.
  • The linky will close at 23.55 GMT on Friday.

We look forward to reading all of your fantastic blog posts and seeing you again next week! Remember to grab our button!

Grab buttons for Twinkly Tuesday

Here’s how to add our badge to your site. Enter HTML editing mode on your post, sidebar, or page. Copy the code in the box below and paste it into your site in your code/html view. Save and publish. That’s it!

Twinkly Tuesday
<div class="twinklytuesday-button" style="width: 200; margin: 0 auto;"><a href="http://hdydi.com/twinkly-tuesday/" target="_blank"><img src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/twinkly_tuesday_badge_2015.jpg" alt="Twinkly Tuesday" width="200" height="200" /></a></div>



Happy Fathers’ Day!

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Categories Celebrations, Father' DayTags , 3 Comments

Happy Fathers’ Day to all the super dads out there.

We’d like to acknowledge the wonderful fathers behind the MoMs of How Do You Do You It?

Loving father of twins A and B.
Mandy‘s husband with their lovely daughters, A and B.
Grandfather of triplets and a singleton. Happy Fathers' Day!
Mari‘s triplets and their cousin with their very proud grandfather.
Ryan is Dad to two sets of twins. There's a dad to celebrate on Fathers' Day!
Amy‘s husband, Ryan, with their older twins. Talk about superdad!
Brand new grandfatherhood, times two, just in time for Father's Day.
Sadia‘s daughters, M and J, at one month old with their grandfather, J’s namesake.
Happy Father's Day to all dads, and twice over to fathers of twins!
SaraBeth‘s husband, Chris, with their little spitfires, Jack and Molly at just over a year old.
Dad to 5: two sets of twins and 1 singleton.
Michelle‘s husband Scott is Superdad to each of 5 children: one set of fraternal twins, one set of identical twins, and a singleton.
Now there's a dad to recognize on Fathers' Day!
Jessica‘s husband with his little ladies.

We hope you know how much we appreciate you.

Why not a DAD triptych for Father's Day?
Beth‘s kids celebrate Dad.

Kids Flying Alone

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Categories Divorce, Older Children, TravelTags , , 4 Comments

Earlier this week, my 9-year-old daughters flew halfway across North America, unaccompanied. This was the first time they’d flown without an adult travelling with them, so I was nervous. It went remarkably well.

I’d done my research, but there were a few things that caught me by surprise, so I thought I would share our experience with you.

One mother's experience putting her children on a plane, unaccompanied.

I printed out Alaska Airlines unaccompanied minor form before I arrived at the airport. It included the children’s information and details for both the adult dropping them off and the adult picking them up.

We arrived at the airport about 2.5 hours before the girls’ flight. We stood in line until a check-in agent was available. When we reached the front of the line, I let the agent, Suzanne, know that the girls would be travelling unaccompanied. She was very sweet.

After she checked their suitcase, Suzanne gave the children stickers indicating their unaccompanied status to wear visibly. Along with the girls’ boarding passes, she issued me a gate pass. I paid $25 per child for the extra attention they would need.

I took the children through security as if I were travelling with them. The one odd moment was with the TSA agent who checked our passes. He asked each child whether I was her mother. They both giggled and informed him that I was.

We filled the girls’ water bottles and stopped for breakfast: some of Austin’s great breakfast tacos. We made our way to the gate and let the agents know that I had two unaccompanied minors. They told us that an airline employee would come and escort from me to their seats. Since we had some time to kill, we sat on the floor and played a game of UNO.

The night before travel... unaccompanied.
This photo was taken the night before the girls’ flight. M has become quite camera-shy of late, and I want to be respectful of her wishes. She instigated this photo, though, and gave me permission to share it.

When it was time to pre-board, M and J were called over the speakers by name. We went up front, but there wasn’t enough staff to go around, so the lady who would take them to their seats said she’d come back for them at the end of boarding. At this point, M began to complain that she felt like throwing up. J was still giddy about the whole adventure, so I was able to focus to M. She said she was going to miss me, but just wanted to hold my hand rather than get a hug.

Finally, it was time for them to go. To distract M, I kissed her on the top of her head, something she has recently declared to be yucky. She was so busy scrubbing off her hair that she didn’t even notice that I didn’t follow them to plane. We’d talked about what would happen, so she knew what to expect.

The only people left at the gate were me and a father who had sent his two children off unaccompanied. His kids were experienced unaccompanied travellers, and he helped put my mind at ease. We stayed at the gate until we were informed that the airplane had taken off (both because of mommy worry and because of airline policy).

On the other end, my former mother-in-law got her own gate pass and retrieved the children at the gate. The unaccompanied children were the last to exit and the airline staff confirmed Grandma’s identity by matching her legal ID to the unaccompanied minor form I’d provided them. When they called me, J and M were in high spirits.

I had made sure that the girls had plenty of activities to keep them occupied. We’d loaded up their Kindle with electronic books checked out of the library. I had packed some crayons and a colouring book, and the girls brought some crafts with them. J had her knitting, and M her sewing.

As it turns out, they didn’t need them. Alaska Airlines issued each of the unaccompanied minors on the flight his or her own iPad to watch movies on. As J put it, she had so much fun on the flight that she forgot I’d packed her snacks. M, on the other hand, appreciated the munchies.

Having been through this once, I feel far more confident about my kids flying alone. I can’t wait for them to come back home so I can hear all about the adventure of the flight back. I promise I won’t kiss M goodnight, although she does still like her bedtime snuggles.

I understand that different airlines have different policies, but the general experience I had seems to be typical.

Celebrate Multiples with the TODAY Show on June 22

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Categories Celebrations, Multiples in the NewsTags 1 Comment

Do you live near New York City? Do you have multiple friends or MoM friends in the area?

The TODAY Show is kicking off a series looking at the joys of being a multiple and want you to be part of the celebration! June 22, 2015 is the big day.

I have a feeling this is going to be the next biggest thing after Twins Days in Twinsburg.

Here’s what the TODAY Show has to say:

We want to fill our plaza with twins… triplets… and quads on Monday, June 22nd. Adults, teens, tweens and babies all invited! So, if you’re a mom of multiples or a multiple yourself come on down and help us show off the bond you have.

If you know you can make it – pre-register so we can look out for you! Here are the instructions:

  1. Go to http://visit.today.com/
  2. Click “RSVP” at the top of the page.
  3. Create a TODAY account by filling out the information you see on the screen. Then, press “Next” at the bottom of the page.
  4. When prompted to choose the date you’re coming. (Choose June 22).
  5. When prompted to select a reason for coming, please choose “Other.” Below that, please write TWINS and provide a short description about you and your sibling(s).
  6. Below that, check whether or not you have special needs, and whether or not you’ve visited the plaza before.
  7. In the “Upload Photo” spot, please upload a file of you and your sibling or your multiples.
  8. Press “Complete RSVP” — and you’re done!

If you end up going, drop us a note to let us know about the experience. We’d love to hear all about it and see your great photos!

Spread the word!

Show up in NYC to join other twins, triplets, and quads for the TODAY Show. June 22, 2015. RSVP at http://visit.today.com/.

Twinfant Tuesday: Baby Bottle Care

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Categories Feeding, Formula, Products, Twinfant TuesdayTags 31 Comments

We’ve written quite a bit about our infant feeding experiences here on HDYDI, but I realize that I’ve neglected to discuss my bottle feeding experiences. That realization wasn’t a surprise. As I’ve told you before, much of my identity as a new mother was tied up in breastfeeding. Baby bottles were up there with gavage tubes on the list of things that I’d rather forget.

The fact is that baby bottles are genius.

A baby bottle can allow a father to feed a child. A baby bottle can allow a working mother to provide her child with breastmilk when she can’t be with her baby. A baby bottle can allow the bond of feeding between a mother and child when breastfeeding isn’t an option.

It’s been nearly 8 years since my daughters moved on from bottles, so I’m not the person to tell you about the newest and greatest development in baby bottle technology. What I can tell you is that, like every other aspect of parenting, it’s not just about what you like. You’ll have to take your child’s preferences into account. With twins, that means two sets of children’s preference, and they may like different things.

With M and J, we used Playtex VentAire bottles for formula and Playtex Nursers with Lansinoh storage bags for expressed breastmilk.

Baby bottles are for formula and expressed breast milk alike.

Once I returned to work, J and M went through 6-7 bottles a day, each. Every night, I had 12-14 bottles to wash. During my limited hours home, I had to breastfeed, eat, occasionally shower, complete household chores, and do that thing where you lie down and close your eyes. I’ve heard it rumoured that it’s called “sleep”. That last thing I wanted to spend my time on was scrubbing bottles.

Since all the bottles we used were open at each end, a bottle brush wasn’t a necessity. I didn’t use it much once the babies had outgrown preemie bottles. Instead, I used my dishwasher.

I had three of these handy dishwasher baskets. All the small parts associated with baby bottles and breastpumps fit in the basket for dishwasher cleaning and disinfection. I was a master of placing all the nipples, rings, bottle valves, pump valves, and lids so that each one was fully exposed to water.

This basket holds small bottle parts for dishwasher disinfection.For the first several months, I would take the washed bottles out of the dishwasher and boil them in a pot of water for disinfection, but over time, I grew to trust the High Heat setting on the dishwasher. Before long, the girls’ immune systems had built up to where disinfection was no longer called for. After all, they were getting plenty of immune exercise from their time a group daycare.

For simplicity, I assembled rings, nipples and lips and stored those stacked beside all the bottles. That way, there was no need to spend time unscrewing bottles or pulling through nipples when it was time to feed.

What are your timesaving tricks for life filled with baby bottles?

Twinkly Tuesday – June 16, 2015

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Categories Twinkly Tuesday2 Comments

Skip to Tuesday Twinklers | Skip to rules | Skip to participant badge | Skip to this week’s links

Welcome to this week’s Twinkly Tuesday, the link party hosted by Sadia here at HDYDI, Caro of The Twinkle Diaries and Lisa at Mummascribbles.

Meet new people, share your posts, and read blogs you might never come across elsewhere. Twinkly Tuesday participants are generous commenters and talented writers.

Each week Lisa, Caro, and I choose a favourite post. If you have been featured, be sure to claim your fame by adding the Twinkly Tuesday Twinkler badge to your blog.

My Tuesday Twinkler for the week is from Carry on Katy. Katy wrote a hilarious piece in praise of her gargantuan feet, complete with her signature illustrations.

Why having big feet is great.

Lisa’s Tuesday Twinkler this week is from Confessions of a Ninja Mom, where Amy talks about the maternal skills she imagined, as a child, that all mothers had: the handmaking of Halloween costumes, baking, and so on. How do you measure up to your own vision?

Ninja Mom's thoughts on what she thought motherhood meant.

Caro’s Tuesday Twinkler is from Little Hearts, Big Love. Louise describes one of those difficult nights where your toddlers don’t let you get anything done or get any sleep. Of course, that always happens when you have the most to do.

Catching-up-on-blogmin-02

Take a moment to visit these posts, if you can. We would love it if you paid a visit to the other host links, and any others that look interesting.

On with this week’s link-up!

Link two posts, old or new, that you think deserve more readers!

Twitter: Be sure to mention me — @hdydi or Caro — @twinklediaries, on Twitter and please use the hashtag #TwinklyTuesday. We’ll be sure to retweet every tweet tagged!

We’ll also visit everyone’s posts and leave comments between us.

Pinterest: I’ll pin every post with an image to the primary Twinkly Tuesday Pinterest board and repin the top pins on the HDYDI Twinkly Tuesday board. Send an email to mummascribbles@hotmail.com or tweet her your email address and she’ll add you to the primary board. No more than 2 posts per week please!

Each week, all three of us pick our favourite posts which will be featured on the following week’s Twinkly Tuesday page.

There are a few easy rules to follow, to ensure that everyone’s posts get the attention they deserve. Please do make the effort to abide by the rules, in fairness to the vast majority who do. We have been forced to block participation for repeat offenders who haven’t responded to multiple reminders.

  • Link up to two posts per week — old or new.
  • Please be kind enough to add our badge to the bottom of your post/s. (Scroll down for the code.) If you haven’t (yet) been featured, please make sure you’re using this badge and not the featured one.
  • Please comment on at least two other posts including the one directly before yours. Visit and comment on as many others as you can. Of course, checking out the hosts’ posts would make us feel very loved.
  • Please use #TwinklyTuesday in your comments so people know where you found them!
  • By linking up, you give us permission to use images from your blog if featured. You also allow us to add you to a mailing list to receive a weekly announcement when Twinkly Tuesday opens.
  • The linky will close at 23.55 GMT on Friday.

We look forward to reading all of your fantastic blog posts and seeing you again next week! Remember to grab our button!

Grab buttons for Twinkly Tuesday

Here’s how to add our badge to your site. Enter HTML editing mode on your post, sidebar, or page. Copy the code in the box below and paste it into your site in your code/html view. Save and publish. That’s it!

Twinkly Tuesday
<div class="twinklytuesday-button" style="width: 200; margin: 0 auto;"><a href="http://hdydi.com/twinkly-tuesday/" target="_blank"><img src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/twinkly_tuesday_badge_2015.jpg" alt=”Twinkly Tuesday” width="200" height="200" /></a></div>