Double your Fun at Twins Days Festival: Your Guide to the World’s Largest Gathering of Twins and Multiples

Posted on
Categories Activities, Celebrations, Community, Friendships with Other Multiples, Travel5 Comments

Twinsdays Festival, Twinsburg, OH. Getting geared up!

The clock is ticking down. It is almost time for the 40th Twins Days Festival, a yearly celebration in Twinsburg, Ohio.

In just 10 days, thousands of twins will arrive, two-by-two, in this small suburb of Cleveland to celebrate all things twin. This will be our family’s sixth year attending Twins Days. Rather than a recap, I’ve decided to put together a little guide to the weekend based on our experiences. The festival has been recorded in the Guinness Book of World Records as the World’s Largest Annual Gathering of Twins and consists of a weekend of activities. We have only participated in a handful of the scheduled activities, but here are some of our family’s favorites.

All the photos in this post were taken by me during our trips to Twins Days Festival and are mostly of my own kids. 

Friday’s Welcome Wiener Roast at Twinsburg High School

All of the events scheduled on Friday are only for registered twins and their families. This is the time when everyone is coming into town (we usually leave Chicago Friday morning and arrive in time for the Wiener Roast). Twins who are pre-registered can pick up their festival packets, which include name tags, programs, Wiener Roast dinner tickets, lots of coupons for local places, information on Twin Studies and more. The name tags also serve as admission to the festival grounds and the ID number on the back is used for any of the contests on Saturday and Sunday.

The Wiener Roast is a time when old friends meet up. There are thousands of photos taken and fun for the whole family. Dinner is, of course, hot dogs, and is included for registered Twins. (Those of us born without a twin can pay a couple dollars and eat too.) There are bounce houses for kids, bags games for adults, lots of camaraderie and catching up with twins you see year after year. Definitely bring your camera and be ready to take pictures. Two sets of twins will get together for a photo then others will join until there are 10 sets in the frame.

The first year we went, we sort of happened upon the event, having no real idea what to expect. Walking into the gymnasium at the high school was honestly surreal. Everyone you see has a double. Nearly everyone dresses like their twin for the event, even if they never do in real life.

Twins Days Festival, Twinsburg, OH. Almost every set of multiples wears matching outfits, even if they wouldn't in real life.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. The theme was Superheros!

Double Take Parade

Double Take Parade, Twins Days Festival, Twinsburg, OH

For me the parade is the highlight of the festival. It is unlike any parade I have ever seen. There are floats and marching bands and politicians waving from convertibles as you’d expect, but the parade is also open to all twins who wish to walk. If you want to be in the parade, plan to get there early. Parking is available at the high school, but the area where the parade starts is about a mile away. There are golf cart shuttles that run back and forth, but it can be difficult if you have a stroller or a wagon, as most of the families with young twins do, so plan to arrive early enough to park and walk. The actual parade route takes you back up past the high school, so you will definitely do some walking that morning. The parade lineup starts at 8 a.m.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. 2015 will be its 40th year.

At the square where everyone gathers, they arrange the twins by age. The youngest ones head out first. This is great since then you finish first and can grab a spot near the end of the parade to see the rest. We tried without a wagon for the first time at age 3 and ended up carrying the kids part of the way. I would suggest unless your kids are used to walking more than a mile in a stretch, bring a stroller or wagon for the under-5 set.

Double Take Parade, Twins Days Festival, Twinsburg, OH

Every year the festival has a theme, which is usually announced a few months in advance. Most people do dress to the theme, though there are plenty who just wear matching t-shirts too. Recent themes have included Western, Superheroes, Circus, Fairytales and the ‘60s, all with a twin flair. Some costumes are quite elaborate, with themed vehicles built on wagons or strollers. It’s definitely fun to see what costumes the theme will inspire. This year’s theme for the 40th festival is “Twins Days: Times 2 Remember!”

Double Take Parade, Twins Days Festival, Twinsburg, OH

Double Take Parade, Twins Days Festival, Twinsburg, OH. A Twins Days Festival Guide.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH

Registered twins who walk in the parade receive a participation ribbon, and they do have trophies for the best theme outfits. There are lots of twins who line the parade route and watch too. You don’t have to walk in the parade. (My kids love being in the parade though.)

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. Your guide to Twins Days - make the most of the festival.

The Festival

The Parade route ends at the bottom of the hill from the festival grounds. Once you’re to the top of the hill you will find carnival rides, tons of fair foods, entertainment, a craft fair, research studies, twin contests and the group photo. My kids’ favorite part last year: The free Twin Pops! Most of the research studies are open to identical twins and adult twins, but we actually had one on skin cancer that my fraternal boys were able to participate in one year.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. The theme that year was The Sixties!

And there is always more posing for photos.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH

The contests are held in a large tent and have lots of different categories, including youngest and oldest twins, best theme outfits, furthest distance traveled for the festival and most-alike and least-alike. There are usually four contests on the stage at any time, it is a little chaotic but fun to watch. When we’ve been there, the youngest twins were only a few weeks old and the oldest were in their 90s.

Competing for Youngest Twins at Twinsburg.

 

Competing for Oldest Twins at Twinsburg.
Youngest and Oldest Twins Contests

My boys actually won second place for least-alike boys last year. We haven’t done the contests on Sunday but I imagine there is a much smaller group competing since the festival on Sunday tends to be less crowded in general.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH

The Group Photo is done on the football field, taken by someone who goes up on a cherry picker to get a good arial photo of the group. Get there early, even if it is hot and miserable. It gets really crowded and I have seen people get a little cut-throat about their spot to late-comers. (Most people are pleasant.)

The photographers only want twins in the photo, so they encourage parents of young kids to stay with them up until the last 1 minute warning and then get outside the photo area. The first year we just left them in the stroller. In the years after that we found some older twins who were willing to keep an eye on them; one year they even sat in the laps of the twins who were willing. Group photos are available for purchase and arrive about a month after the festival.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. Posing for the group shot.

Twins Days Festival Twinsburg, OH. The group shot. The official photographer is up on a cherry picker to be able to fit everyone in!

A Few Other Notes

  • Twinsburg is a pretty small city. There are only a couple hotels and they book up fast with regulars who go every year. I also understand they can get pretty rowdy. We have always stayed in another suburb about 15 minutes from Twinsburg.
  • There are definitely regulars who go every year. We have met so many twins who have been going since they were babies who are now teenagers, who have made life-long friends at the festival and who consider it “home” where everyone there understands you in a way you just don’t get outside Twinsburg.  (There is even the story about identical twins who married other identical twins they met at Twins Days, and had identical twins.) Every year when we leave, my husband and I lament how the weekend makes us each wish we had a twin.
  • Sunday is much less crowded than Saturday. The first year we went to the festival on Sunday and did the group photo that day, it was a lot more sparse. My kids got their picture in National Geographic online. (I found that out because it showed up in another page I follow.)
  • There are tons of other events I didn’t even touch on here like a golf tournament, a 5K, Talent Shows, even fireworks.
  • It can be hot. REALLY HOT. Bring plenty of water and stay hydrated.
  • It’s a good idea to bring business/mommy cards with your contact info. You’ll meet tons of people and it’s an easy way to exchange information.
  • There is a lot of press there. As I said, my kids ended up in National Geographic, but I also found a picture of them on the local Cleveland CBS website and I was interviewed for a story once in the Wall Street Journal. The Friday events are no-press but during the rest of the festival, expect cameras and news stories.
  • Other twins we have met always want to know who is Twin A and who is Twin B. There is a certain kinship, I guess, with the A’s and B’s and we were asked that often.
  • It’s not just for Twins! There are lots of Triplets and Even Quadruplets who attend. It’s called Twins Days but it is definitely for all multiples.

Are you a regular? Will you be going to the first time? Share your tips, experiences, and questions in the comments.

Jen Wood is a computer-nerd-turned-stay-at-home Mom to 5-year-old fraternal twin boys. They live in the suburbs of Chicago and make a yearly trek to Twinsburg Ohio for the Twins Days festival since they happened upon it when her boys were 9 months old. She is counting down the days until the dynamic duo start Kindergarten next month but will probably freak out from all that quiet.

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Take Your Child to College

Posted on
Categories Activities, Education, Going out, Parenting37 Comments

I encourage you to spend a few hours with your kids at your local university or community college. You’ll be surprised at what you can find to do there. Without them realizing it, you’ll be setting your children up to imagine themselves as university students in a few short years.

I know that college isn’t for everyone. Many of us are happier for going straight into the job market or getting vocational training. I do believe, though, that every child has a right to know that a four year degree can be an option. Given my daughters’ love of formal education, I would be very surprised if they didn’t elect to head straight for a Bachelors degree after high school. I did. Their dad didn’t. They have options.

I work at a university, so I know many of the hidden gems of campus. Ever since my daughters were toddlers, we’ve visited the campus on occasional weekends to go exploring. Sometimes, there are child-focused activities, such as Fossil Day, Explore UT, and the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland exhibit.

The Alice in Wonderland exhibit at the Harry Ransom Center.

Even without those, though, there’s plenty to do. We never go to campus without paying a visit to the Turtle Pond.

The University of Texas at Austin Turtle Pond is a great stop for little ones.

Scavenger hunts are a wonderful way to occupy a few hours. When my daughters were learning the alphabet, I’d challenge them to find each letter as we roamed the university. They loved carrying little clipboards and crossing out the letters, one at a time, as they looked at signs, fliers, and license plates.

UT Austin street sign. Why not take your little ones on an adventure to your closest university campus.

We’ve examined the details of architecture on campus. It’s amazing what you notice if you look closely. My office was in this building for years, but I never stop discovering new details I’ve missed.

MAI details

As the girls grew older, we began to talk about the people whose names were engraved on university buildings.

On our last campus outing, I gave the girls license to take photos. J noticed how beautifully painted the ceiling of a walkway was and took this photo. I’ve walked past that building for 14 years and never noticed.

Notice the details.

We are building wonderful memories. My daughters have an image of where I go during the day.

A plaque at UT Austin.

I’m also showing them that a university is a place they want to be. They see college students walking campus, carrying books in and out of the library, sitting on the grass and strumming guitars. They can see themselves at college because they’ve spent time on this, and other university campuses. They’ve visited my alma mater in California and several other Texas, South Carolina, and North Carolina colleges. When we set forth to visit the planetarium in Chapel Hill, NC, I didn’t even realize it was part of the university until we arrived.

Forget take your kid to work day. Take your child to college!

Barbara Jordan statue at UT Austin.Have you and your kids explored a college campus? What did you do there?

 

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Make-It Monday: Fun & Easy Crafts for Multiples

Posted on
Categories crafts, Make-It MondaysLeave a comment

Being a parent to a pair of twins, triplets or to children of different ages can make your life a busy one. Multiples can be quite a handful, each with their own quirks and interests. They can also be that much more fun. So how does one go about keeping them engaged in arts & crafts and educational activities?

With a few little tweaks to craft activities and science experiments, you can personalize them for your kids. When children relate to them on a personal level, they are more likely to want to participate and learn. These projects can become joint activities that teach kids to collaborate, bring out their own personality, and celebrate being a part of a unique identity as twins or triplets.

Find ways to allow each of your multiples to make a craft or project her own.
The Twin Chain

Twins can discover more about being twins with this activity. First, discuss different types of twins and how each one is different. In addition to distinguishing between fraternal and identical twins, you can dig deeper into conjoined and mirror image identical twins. Take drawing paper and fold it into half. Draw the outline of a doll with full arms and cut along the outline with a pair of scissors. Avoid cutting through the paper fold line. This will give you two dolls holding hands. Make around seven sets of it. Ask your children to write the type of twin on one side and their characteristics on the other side.

Paper chains offer a fun opportunity to discuss different types of twins with your multiples.

Symmetry in Nature

Children can discover the symmetry in nature with a simple activity. Symmetry is defined as, “The correspondence of the form and arrangement of elements or parts on opposite sides of a dividing line or plane or about a center or an axis.” On a trip to the park or hike along a nature trail, collect natural objects like flowers, rocks, and leaves.

Later, you can lay them out and ask your kids to distinguish between symmetric and non-symmetric objects. Take it further by snipping the leaf along its line of symmetry. Give half to each of your kids. Ask them to place it on a piece of plain paper and draw its symmetric opposite. That is, the missing side should be a mirror image of the leaf.

Think Tweedledum and Tweedledee could grasp the concept of symmetry?

The Brave Bears

For triplets, here’s something fun. Remember Harris, Hubert and Hamish from the movie Brave, who turn into bear cubs?

Ask each child to pick out their favorite from these triplets, and make a felt bear puppet each. For this, you need: bear pattern, dark and light grey felt, Googly eyes, glue, sewing thread and needle, black button, and scissors.

Take a printout of one of the bear cubs and trace an outline on paper. Cut out the outline and lay this pattern on dark grey felt that is folded in half. Cut out the felt along the outline so that you will have two bear outlines. Now, fold the light grey felt in half and draw a round shape, and cut. Also cut out an oval for the nose. Take one of the dark grey felt bear outlines and sew the two round light grey felt in place of the eyes, and the oval light grey felt in the nose area. Sew both the bear outlines together along the edges, leaving the bottom area open. Finish by gluing the Googly eyes and sticking the button for the nose.

Got triplets? Why not help them each make hand puppets of one of the Brave bears.Three-Step Art

Here’s an exercise in collaboration for triplets or for twins and singleton sibling. Divide tasks between each of them. Ask the first child to gather old crayons, strip them of the paper covering, and crush them with the back of a ladle. The second child has to lay out an old hand towel, keep a wax paper on it, pile a small amount of the crushed crayons on this paper, and cover it with another sheet of wax paper. You can step in and use a slightly warm iron over the wax paper. The third child can peel off the crayon design after it has cooled, punch a hole at the top, and thread a ribbon through it.

Which is your favorite activity to engage multiples?

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Everything I Need to Know About Toddlers I Learned From Story Time

Posted on
Categories Activities, Parenting, Toddler Thursday4 Comments

I first went to story time at the library when my oldest were almost 2. I thought it would be a one time activity, but Ms Jen was so compelling we ended up there every week. That was 5 years ago. My little girls are 2.5 and although other activities tend to get in the way, we still make it a priority to go see Ms Jen on Thursdays at 10:30. They always start the half hour session with “Bubblegum” and end it with “Alligator”.  The favorite activity was always petting the stuffed alligator puppet. I ended up buying the song and searching the internet for 2 stuffed alligators just like it. Recently my kids wanted to give away those beloved puppets but I wouldn’t let them.

Ms Jen always started her story times with some guidelines that I found were pretty helpful for the rest of the toddler day too.  I’m going to share them with you, but you might want to sit on a rug with alphabet letters on it to fully absorb this information!

PARTICIPATE

I don’t mean the toddlers. We all know they participate plenty. We all know our kids grow up too quickly. They don’t need to be reminded.

Maybe need to be more connected. When your little one puts on a funny hat and says, “Look at me!”, don’t just look. Put one on too! It takes 2 seconds and you’ve managed to catch their eyes light up just a little bit more.

Now, I understand that you can’t participate in everything everytime. Even the toddlers sit and watch sometimes. But make sure your sit and watch time is active too. I remember waking up for 3am feedings and timing it so I could watch a 45 minute Ellen episode. It was just enough time for me to feed, change, and swaddle 2 babies back to sleep. They got what they needed and so did I. That feeding was for me. The rest of them were saved for the babies.

MINIMIZE DISTRACTIONS

This is a tough one cause I know we’re all on our phones a lot. Multi tasking always!

Wouldn’t it help us get through a tantrum if we also didn’t have to get the cookies out of the oven. I know, we don’t have time to make cookies. I mean make a doctor’s appointment.

When you’re on “mother time,” be on mother time. Save the phone call for when you’ve locked yourself in the bathroom. I like what one mom said to me. She mentioned that she doesn’t ask her toddlers to do something until she is physically able to help them. If you say, “Go get your shoes,” don’t be surprised if they need help. Be ready yourself so you can provide that help. Tantrum avoided!

If we were texting during a job interview I doubt we would get that job. Let’s give our children the same respect.

BE PREPARED FOR BAD DAYS

And we all have them.  We have bad minutes and hours too. Guess what? It’s okay!

If you’re prepared, then not much can faze you. If you know your toddlers hate to get in their carseats, just know you’re going to have to add 45 minutes to your errand. Get a cooler for your car so your milk doesn’t spoil while you pry them in.

If you know they are going to climb out of cribs every bedtime, grab yourself a snack, pull up a rug with your device of choice and get caught up on Netflix. You can’t be prepared for every situation, but you can be prepared for enough of them to avoid problems.

Today I brought 3 towels to the pool instead of 4. I now know that was the biggest mistake ever and I will never do that again.

RELAX

You don’t have to take yoga in order to relax. (It helps, though.) It’s true that kids follow your mood and your flow. So if you’re relaxed, they will be too.

I could tell my toddler was about to get frustrated, so I got there first and stamped my foot and screamed, “I can’t do it!” She was so surprised I knew what she was going to do that we had a big giggle fest instead and the moment was diffused.

Ihave hardly had to yell lately because of this principle. I just calmly give them choices that they can live with. “We are going to change your diaper. Do you want to do it the sad way or the happy way?” This principle doesn’t mean you have to be floating on a cloud all of the time. It just means that the cliche is true: “This too shall pass.”

ASK FOR HELP

Yes! All the time, for anything.

It doesn’t always mean we will get the help we need, but if we don’t ask, we don’t get. It seems natural to ask for help when we have newborns, but they don’t go away once they start sleeping through the night. They become toddlers and then teenagers!

  • Get help from the internet: Your hubby needs razors? Amazon Prime.
  • Get help from neighbors: Have a sleeping baby and need to do a school pickup? Bring the baby monitor next door.
  • Get help from friends: Have a lunch date at a playplace. You get adult conversation and kids burn energy.
  • Get help from family. Yes, we may have in-law problems, but if they do your dishes while you nap then you don’t have to talk to them.
  • Get help from your spouse: Let them load the dishwasher their own way; I promise it’s ok.
  • Get help from anyone: Hire a cleaning service!!
  • Most importantly, get help from God/church. True story: I prayed for 10 more minutes of sleep and sure enough my babies went back to sleep and then on the dot of 10 minutes started fussing. Didn’t need an alarm clock that day!

How will you implement your own “Story Time Rules” in order to deal with your sweet* toddlers!

 

*I highly recommend a book called Toddlers are A**holes! It helps with the relaxing part!

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Canvas Art – A Father’s Day Gift Idea

Posted on
Categories Age Brackets, Celebrations, crafts, DIY, Make-It Mondays1 Comment

Father’s Day is on Sunday. It’s getting down to the wire, MoMs! If you are running out of ideas (or cash) for a Fathers’ Day gift, here’s a quick and easy project everyone can do.

I wanted to have all four kids enjoy the craft and that’s tricky because of their age gap. My oldest is 17 with the twin “cabooses” at 4. I also wanted it to reflect their personalities.

I had originally thought we could all make our own card or picture, but those tend to get discarded over time. Everyone loves to paint so I went to my local craft store in search of cheap options.  I found an 16×20 canvas for under five dollars. The acrylic craft paint was also inexpensive.

I sectioned the canvas with painters tape and let the kids have at it. The only rules were: they had to fill their entire square and no “trespassing” into their sibling’s square. It couldn’t have turned out any better! Each square shows their personality and creativity.

Last minute family Father's Day gift - segmented canvas.

If your kids are too young to follow the trespassing rule, tape down paper to cover all but one of the openings, leaving that one section for one child to paint. When a work of art is dry, cover it and move onto the next child and next opening.

Best project yet!

A cute gift idea for #FathersDay. Give each child part of the canvas to decorate.

I’m thinking of using this same division of the canvas again. I think it would be great for collages, glue art, sand, or even photos. Happy Father’s Day!!

If you decide to try this, send us a picture!

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Wouldn’t Do Without Wednesday: Felt for Projects

Posted on
Categories DIY, Products, Wouldn't Do Without WednesdayTags , , 1 Comment

We have turned the spare room into The Activity Room. In addition to the guest bed and some storage for guests, the room is filled with crafting supplies. We have glue, tape, kids’ scissors, sequins, stickers, paper of all sorts, crayons, markers, paint, knitting needles, yarn and sewing supplies. These include felt for projects. Lots and lots of felt.

Occasionally, I propose crafting projects to J and M. For the most part, I allow them to come up with their own projects ideas. In the last few weeks, M has been getting deeply into sewing. She’s been making small purses for her friends and clothes for her toys. She took some photos of her daughter Valentina modeling her latest creations and allowed me to share them with you.

9-year-old access to felt, needles and thread translate into clothing for stuffed toys.

Home sick today, J was also inspired to try her hand at sewing, although she’s usually a knitter. She decided that she wanted to make a doll. We found the perfect pattern, Mimi Kirchner’s Felt Doll, at The Purl Bee. She’s made some pretty impressive headway for someone who learned to backstitch and whipstitch today and has never handled fiberfill before.

Mimi Kirchner's simple felt doll pattern is a good one for the beginning seamstress, aged 8 and up.

Ages 8 and 9 are just wonderful when it comes to learning new skills. Children this age have a sudden increase in patience and are able to understand that hard work pays off. They’re willing to put the time in for a satisfactory outcome. They’re on the young side to have lost faith in their abilities, so they’re quite willing to try new things. They don’t yet have the critical eye to be thrown by most newbie mistakes. A few tears may be shed, but a hug from Mommy can still make it all better.

That said, my daughters aren’t quite up to hand hemming their creations yet. That’s why I wouldn’t do without felt squares in our Activity Room supplies. The beauty of felt, in contrast to other fabrics, is that it doesn’t fray, and therefore doesn’t require hemming. It cuts easily, so I don’t have to make my fabric shears available to the children. They can use their own scissors. It’s stiff enough to hold up to small fingers instead of draping over a child’s hand as he or she learns a new stitch.

Felt is the perfect fabric for children learning to sew.

I picked up our latest stash of felt at Jo-Ann Fabric. I’ve bought it at Michaels in the past, and I’ve found amazing prices online for other crafting supplies at Factory Direct Craft. When my daughters were smaller, I’d cut small figures out of felt, sometimes people, sometimes animals, and sometimes abstract shapes. Against a background of construction paper, we put on plays. Or the girls created shapes. Or they made piles.

Wouldn't Do Without Wednesday at hdydi.com: This week, the gogo Kidz Travelmate.Felt is extraordinarily versatile. If your kids are old enough to keep it out of their mouths, I’d recommend picking some up. You never know what creations your creative children will think up.

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Make-It Monday: Father’s Day Gifts from the Kiddos

Posted on
Categories Celebrations, crafts, Make-It MondaysTags 1 Comment
Father’s Day is fast approaching, and I’m sharing a couple of the ways we’ve made Daddy feel the love on his special day.
I wish I’d had the wherewithal to do this the girls’ first Father’s Day…but, just shy of 6 months old…I think I was still in somewhat of a haze.  Since the girls’ second Father’s Day, though, we’ve been carrying out the traditional of our “Top 10 List”, complete with hand prints, and — since the girls were three — signatures, too.
HDYDI-fd2
On the center card: “The Top 10 Reasons We Think You’re the Best Daddy in the World”, on which I list some of the fun things the girls love to do with their daddy.  I try to come up with things that represent what the girls are doing at that given age/stage.
This picture is from our 2011 list when the girls were two, and it includes cuteness along the lines of:
  • You help us build the best “structures” with our blocks, and the tallest towers.
  • You never tire of sampling our tea and lemonade, and all our culinary creations.
  • You show us how to be super sweet to our furry sister Sasha.
  • Two words…tickle time!!!
  • You sing “Found a Peanut” every night, even though we know it’s not your favorite song, and you make up all sorts of silly lyrics to “Baa-Baa Black Sheep” at our requests.
  • You give us nose kisses the first thing when you come home from work, and you talk to us through the window in the backyard when you cut the grass.

And every list ends with, #10. You’re ours.

Last year, we added a fun new twist to our Father’s Day celebration, and our girls thought it was so much fun.  I drew conversation bubbles and the girls wrote a Father’s Day message.

HDYDI-fd1This year, I plan to have the girls hold the letters D-A-D-D-Y for a picture.  I’m sure that will incite plenty of giggles, too.

Some hand print art and pictures of his girlies…what more could a daddy want?  And I love getting the girls involved in the gift-giving.  That’s what it’s all about!

Do you have any Father’s Day traditions?  We’d love to hear your ideas!

MandyE is mom to six-year old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Make It Monday: Spring-Inspired Craft

Posted on
Categories Activities, crafts, Lifestyle, Make-It Mondays, Parenting, Preschoolers3 Comments

Before my twin girls started kindergarten last fall (sniff, sniff!), I loved nothing more than an excuse for a themed playdate.  A craft and a snack to match?  Sign me up!

With our busy schedules these days, we don’t get together with our twinkie BFFs nearly as much as we’d like to.  I ran across this picture of a playdate from last March, and it just warmed my heart.

A fun Easter project for little ones: Paper plate chicks!While I try not to be a hoarder, I still have these little chickies hanging around…they are just so stinkin’ cute!

We started with a white paper plate (I love the cheap-y kind for crafts).  The kiddos colored their plates yellow, and then they glued googly eyes and a triangle beak on for the face.

For the wings, the kiddos traced their hands.  Depending on their scissor-skill-level, some of them cut out their handprints, and the MoMs did the handprints for the others.

It was a challenge for our 4 1/2- and 5-year olds to accordion fold the legs, but they had fun trying.  :)

There are all sorts of variations you can do, depending on the skill of your crafters-in-training.  If you’re brave enough to break out the paints, you could even do some handprint chicks on canvas.  (There are a million cute inspirational ideas on Pinterest!)  However you do it, I think it’s a great way to {finally!} welcome spring!

Happy Crafting!!!

MandyE is mom to six-year-old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.

 

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Make-It Monday: A Token of Thanks

Posted on
Categories Activities, crafts, Lifestyle, Make-It Mondays, Parenting1 Comment

I had great intentions of doing something nice for our mail carrier and sanitation crews over the holidays.  With the girlies in kindergarten and me being back at work full-time, though, my intentions these days don’t always make it into actions.

We’ve had a crazy amount of snow over the past three weeks (relative to our area, anyway), and I thought this would be a great time to say “thank you” to the folks who’ve continued to work, oftentimes much later hours than they normally would, to keep things rolling during this weather.

kitkat1The last trip we made to the grocery store, I picked up packages of snack-size Kit-Kat bars.  I wrote a little note, and the girls were thrilled to add some handmade touches.

They were giddy to leave this in the mailbox on Saturday morning.  And they were ecstatic to get a thank-you note in return from the mail carrier, saying we’d made her day.

Later in the week, we’ll tape a little package (wrapped in a zip-seal bag) to the top of the garbage can, and we’ll try to catch the recycling crew early Friday morning.

I love seeing the girls excited about doing something for someone else, and I was reminded it doesn’t take much to make someone else’s day.

kitkat2

MandyE is mom to six-year old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Are My Children UNDER-Scheduled?

Posted on
Categories Activities, Balance, Community, Lifestyle, Parenting, School-Age10 Comments

My girls just turned six.  To cruise around my friends’ pictures on Facebook, those who have similar-age children (or younger), I have to question if my kiddos are missing out on something.

I see pictures from dance recitals, piano lessons, gymnastics, cheerleading, soccer, and basketball.  And my mouth is watering these days at all the pictures of kiddos selling Girl Scout cookies.

Our girls have experienced very little of that.

They’ve taken swim lessons the past three summers.  The first summer they didn’t exactly love it, but they’ve had a great time the past two years.  And the summer when they were four, they took a two-month tumbling class and had a great time.

It’s certainly not that I’m opposed to them participating in activities, but, as I’ve stepped back to assess our history to date, I feel fiercely protective of their time, and of our time as a family.

The girls are now in kindergarten, and our Monday-Friday are jam-packed.  Their daddy is a teacher, so they come home with him after school.  After a snack and a little play time with the kitties, they’re often just finishing up “homework” when I come home around 5:30.  I rush to get supper on the table, and we are usually finishing our meal shortly after 6:00.  If we’re lucky, we have time for a game or a book or two before we begin our bedtime routine at 6:30.

(Yes, our girls are in bed by 7:00!  They seem to require 11 1/2 – 12 hours of sleep!)

On the weekends, I try to balance getting family errands done (groceries and laundry and cooking ahead) with hanging out with the girls.  If the weather is nice, we love to go to the park.  We try to head to the zoo or children’s museum every 6 weeks or so.  And I block off plenty of time for unstructured play at home, and crafting, and reading, and snuggles.

Newly working mom wonders whether her kindergartners are under-scheduled as she protects family time.

These days, I just don’t see where we’d put a practice or two a week and games/events on the weekends.

I think our girls’ schedules are plenty packed as they are, and I have strongly mixed feelings about introducing anything else into the mix.  Still, I can’t help but question if I’m providing them with appropriate access to trying different activities.

HELP!!!  Are my kiddos “missing out” at this age?  Does this get easier as kiddos get older (and don’t go to bed so early)?  How does your family prioritize activities?

MandyE is mom to six-year old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.

Share this...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrShare on RedditDigg thisShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone