Toddler Reality

The other day it occurred to me that the minions are seriously misinformed about a number of realities of the world and even though we often try to correct them, they insist on their own unique versions of reality and we entertain a number of them because they are cute.  I don’t want to correct Molly when she tells me that she loves “Honeydude melon”, but I do because that’s my job.

Below are 10 tongue and cheek truth bombs that I would love to lay on my toddlers, should they ever believe me and it not completely shatter their worlds.
boydog
10 Truth Bombs I Would Love To Lay On My Toddlers
  1. Any man with grey hair over 55 is not your Papa or Grandpa.  This became particularly awkward when Jack tried to sit on a friends father’s lap because he wanted to spend time with his grandpa.
  2. Just because the guy who installs the new hot water heater is a tall Eastern Asian man who kinda of looks like a friend of ours doesn’t mean that they’re the same person.  I’m pretty sure that he doesn’t want to play with you and thinks you’re a little bit racist.
  3. Those aren’t your “Elmos” they’re your elbows.
  4. Those aren’t my “elbows” they’re my breasts.
  5. Whenever you tell me that you’re, “never going to cry again” I don’t believe you.  Also when you’re laying on the floor throwing a tantrum screaming, “I’m not a baby!” you’re kind of being a giant baby.
  6. Your stuffed Bunny isn’t really a bunny, it’s a dog.  Sorry.
  7. That picture at Nana and Grampa’s is of a Polar bear, not a dog.
  8. Your concept of ownership is ill conceived: The last time I checked that is not your car or your house, but we can share.
  9. Your assortment of candles, candle holders, wine corks and contact cases are not actually toys, they’re random objects that you’ve collected like some sort of weird hoarder.  When you ask other kids to come over and play with your “toys” they will likely be disappointed.
  10.  That old man with the big bushy white beard who wears a red t-shirt and hangs out smoking in front of the local legion/recreation club is usually drunk and definitely NOT Santa.

This post originally appeared on my blog Multiple Momstrosity but I thought I would share it as a part of HDYDI’s Toddler Thursday Series.

Bedroom Configurations

Just this past weekend we almost put in an offer on a house.

I know. Crazy since we had already decided to put that dream on hold to pursue my working part-time for this next school year, or possibly two. However, the husband had continued to look at listings online, and I’ve been open to moving to an area close to where I’ve decided to send the kids for elementary school (for its Mandarin dual immersion program).

This house is walking distance to the school, right next to a golf course. It’s just within our price range. Large lot, big square footage, a house our family of 5 could be comfortable in for several years. However… It has only 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, the same as we currently have. Though they are bigger than the ones we currently have, and there is space to add a fourth bedroom and third bathroom when someday we could afford it. However… The school district (other than this dual immersion elementary school) is not ideal, which means even though the area is desirable, the house will not appreciate as much as homes in other nearby cities. However… Though we could pay the new mortgage if we cut back on our lifestyle and watch our spending, it would be uncomfortably tight while I’m part-time, and that would be after sinking all our savings into the down payment.

For these reasons, my conservative husband and I decided the time is not right for us to move right now. We really like this house, in fact it is the only one that I have liked, and the housing market in our area is on another surge, but we’d be scrambling to sell our current house, working out all the details of our financing with our future budget, and generally putting ourselves under a great deal of stress. It is doable, but not something we feel ready to take on.

But this has gotten me thinking. If I was willing to move to a 3 bedroom house, then I guess I’m not as eager to move my twins into separate bedrooms as I thought. True, this house has bigger bedrooms and more common living space as well, but the twins would still be sharing a bedroom, or the girls would have to share. I did not think that I would be ok with that. But I guess I am, for the right house. Which means, then, that I should have no problems staying at our current house for a few more years.

So, what are your bedroom configurations, fellow MoMs? Do you have boy/girl twins sharing a bedroom? Until what age? How do you create space separation in a shared bedroom?

lunchldyd is mom to 19mo b/g twins and their 4yo sister.

Twinfant Tuesday: Ways to carry two babies when strollers are not allowed

It was long after my twins were born, 8 months to be exact, that I felt comfortable leaving the house and going to social events by myself.  Story hours and play dates were new to my agenda and although these  events were crucial in helping me feel less isolated and introducing me to friends in my new town, they also brought with them many new challenges.  For example, after feeling so proud of myself for making it out of the house and being on time for my first ever story hour, my spirits were quickly squashed when I discovered that the staff did not allow mothers to bring strollers into the performance room.  I was shocked and almost felt like crying when the kind librarian informed me that I has to transport my kids inside without the help of my trusty stroller.  I felt awkward as I carried my car seats into the performance room.  I felt clumsy as I placed them on the floor, sat in front of them, unbuckled them and then left the car seats near me- taking up valuable space, but feeling unable to move them because I did not want to leave my children unattained.  I also felt silly as I  packed my boys up to leave and I know I bumped into several people with my wide load.

I encountered similar difficulties when attending play group meetings at new friends’ houses.  Some walkways made wheeling a stroller up to the front door impossible.  Others had long sets of stairs leading to the front door creating a whole new obstacle.  These new situations taught me the best and easiest ways to carry my guys around when strollers were not permitted or usable.  Here are some suggestions in case you find yourself in a similar situation:

1.  Place one baby in a carrier and hold the other on your hip.  I used this method most often when I was faced with a difficult transportation scenario.  I was able to support my (somewhat lighter) son on my hip and use the carrier to support the weight of my other boy.  I felt like I still had one hand free for opening doors, digging keys out of pockets and placing the baby back in the car seat.  This was my favorite way to roll.
2.  Carry the babies in their infant car seats. I used the method if I had to, but by 8 months, my boys were heavy!  Also, when carrying kids this way, you do not have any free hands to open doors (especially your own car doors).  This method is less than ideal for some situations.
3.  Use a twin carrier or two carriers (one on the front and one of the back): There are some twin specific carriers that allow you to carry two babies relatively hands free.  Be mindful of the weight limitations of these carriers; however, as they are really meant to be used when your babies are small.  Alternatively, some choose to wear one baby in a single carrier on the front and one in a single carrier on the back.  This can work nicely for situations where you have a long walk or when you may have to stand for a long period of time.
4.  Carry one baby on each hip: As twin moms we are really good at carrying both of our children around the house at the same time but sometimes getting both babies into your arms is a challenge.  I have always had good luck picking up two babies from their beds but have found that it is tough to grab two from their car seats or from the ground.  Keep this in mind if you do not have anyone to help hand you the second child.

I am sure there are many other ways people have engineered a solution to this unique problem.  Please let us know how you transport your kids when strollers are not allowed or ideal.

How do you do it? Parenting Link Up #29

Skip to this week’s links | Skip to featured posts | Skip to linkup rules

Welcome to the How Do You Do It? parenting link up party. Here, you have an opportunity to share your posts with other parent bloggers and the followers of How Do You Do It? and What’s up Fagans?.

How do you do it? is a community of mothers of multiples that believes in supporting each other, in sharing our experiences and questions, in friendship, and in encouragement. The link up is open to all of our readers, whether you have multiples or not, where you can share your wisdom, your favorite posts, your insights, with our online community here at HDYDI and What’s up Fagans?.

Each week, we pick some of our favorite posts and feature them the following week on our site! Plus, we pin them on Pinterest, tweet them on Twitter, and share them on Google+ and Facebook! Get some more exposure for your great content, and don’t forget to check out the featured posts from last week’s link up!

Plus, ldskatelyn of What’s up Fagans? is co-hosting our link party on her blog as well. One party on two blogs means double the exposure and community.

Each HDYDI parenting link up party accepts new links from Monday morning through Friday at noon.

So tell us: How do you handle conception, pregnancy, prematurity, birth, and postpartum recovery? How do you handle tantrums, diapering bills, stress, and potty training? How do you handle education and special needs? How do you balance the needs of several children with a marriage? How do you manage being a stay-at-home mom, a working mom, or a single parent? And how do you find time for yourself?

How do you do it?!


This week’s featured posts:

We had a lot of linkers this last week! Thank you to all of our new linkers! We welcome you and hope you enjoy the other posts being shared. Two posts were tied for most clicked for this week so I’m featuring both!

working-momMisty of Beautiful Ashes shares her side of the tale of being a Working Mom to shed light on what exactly these amazing women do. Are you a working mom too?

What is going on inside of those teenage boy’s heads? Well, Marie of Normal Everyday Life shares a humorous post about how her teenage son clearly isn’t understanding what Mom’s nagging really mean.

6 Reasons Why I WON'T Give Parenting Advice - MePlus3Today.blogspot.comI love this post from Sarah of Me Plus 3…Today! As a new mom of twins toddlers and a baby, and as a recent widow, she has such a unique situation, and I’m sure many people would love to know “How do you do it?!” But, Sarah gives 6 reasons why she won’t be giving any away. Do you give parenting advice on your blogs? To your friends? To strangers?

If you were featured above make sure to grab our featured button and display it proudly on your blog! How Do You Do It? Featured Post

<a href="http://hdydi.com/features/hdydi-parenting-link-party/"><img alt="How Do You Do It? Featured Post" src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/hdydi-link-up-featured-badge.jpg" height="125" width="125"></a>

Parenting Link Up PartyRules for the How Do You Do It? Parenting Link Up Party:

  1. Follow and connect with HDYDI on the social media platforms that you use. Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Google+ | Blog Lovin
  2. Follow and connect with What’s up Fagans? on the social media platforms you use: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Google+ | Blog Lovin’
  3. Follow the How do you do it? Parenting Link Up Board on Pinterest where we pin every link shared!
  4. Link up to 3 great parenting posts below! Please, no recipes posts! Of course, link directly to a post, not your main page. Also, under “name” put the title of your post.
  5. Check out at least 3 other links! This is a party, so mingle!
  6. Leave an awesome comment for those you visit and tell them you found them at the HDYDI link party! And pin them/share the posts that you really like.
  7. Tweet: Add YOUR #parenting #advice to @hdydi's #linkup! Tell everyone #howdoyoudoit! http://ctt.ec/LRfWz+ #motherhood #momwisdomTweet about the link party, pin our link party badge, share it on Facebook, or otherwise promote this party! The more the party grows, the more exposure your posts will receive, the more fun you’ll have, and the more encouragement and ideas we’ll all receive!
  8. HDYDI Parenting Link Up PartyPut How Do You Do It?‘s Parenting Link Up badge on your site! Put it in your side bar, at the bottom of the post you shared, or on a party page!
    <a href="http://hdydi.com/features/hdydi-parenting-link-party/"><img alt="How Do You Do It? Parenting Link Up Party" src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/hdydi-link-party-9-.jpg" height="125" width="125"></a>


Toddler Thursday: A Singleton Mom Tries to “Get” Twinniness

Consider me a convert to the twin mystique.

As a singleton myself, I’m often baffled by my twins’ relationship with each other. Honestly, I’ve wondered if being a twin is somewhat of a detriment – the sharing, the constant presence, the neighbor that calls them both by one composite name – and I’ve downplayed their twinship in order to honor them as individuals. I’ve always been wary of the super secret wonder twins bond that I’d heard so much about but hadn’t seen up close.

RebeccaD sees the twin relationship bloom between her toddlers, but can't fully understand it. She's not a twin.

As my boys grow in toddlerhood, their twinniness is coming out full force. I’m now convinced that there is something between them that makes their experience of the world very different than a singleton’s. I often have to check my own singleton perspective and accept a new way of seeing things.

I wouldn’t say that my boys have a secret language, per se. But they practice a word between themselves for a long time before I can understand what they mean. For example, about a month ago, they were saying something that sounded like “Annie.” They would trade the sound back and forth all the time. Finally, through my careful deduction and their increased skill, I realized they were saying “I need.” Currently they tell each other something that sounds like “mo-nay” (Mayonnaise? Money? Monet?) – I have no idea what that means. But I bet it will become clear pretty soon. Meanwhile, they look at me like, “Why aren’t you getting this?!”

Now that I let the boys pick out their own clothes (mostly), I’ve discovered that they prefer to match. I feel kind of embarrassed, being “that mom” with her matching twins, especially since I rarely dressed them matching as infants and they don’t look much alike. From my singleton perspective, I expect them to make choices based on individual preferences. But for my little twins, the only thing better than wearing your favorite shirt is your brother is wearing it too! One twin’s joy is incomplete without his brother’s joy.

The boys also have their own complex system of economics. M drinks so much smoothie at a sitting that I decided to get him a bigger thermos because I’m tired of constantly refilling (after he throws it across the room in frustration). Typically, R barely drinks half of his smoothie. My singleton brain thinks, ‘M needs something, I will give it to him.’ Well, it was a big flop. R instantly laid claim to the thermos, the way he does with anything new, and M acted terrified of the thing. He actually ran away when I tried to give it to him. After some deep breathing to quell my exasperation, I realized my error. I should have given it to R. He would have tried it out and realized he didn’t want it; M would have seen that R had it and therefore would have wanted it. Such a maze, but so normal to them.

My singleton brain also works against me when one of my boys is injured. Tonight, M fell off the bathroom stool and hit his head (many tears and a goose egg, but he’s fine). R was very concerned and reached out to hug and pat his brother. When M calmed down somewhat, R skipped off to another activity. But when M started crying again, R was right back at my side, trying to take M’s blanket, begging me to hold him. Again, I was so frustrated. I just wanted to cuddle and comfort my hurt little boy. But that was thinking like a singleton. I finally realized I had two hurt boys. Where there is shared pain, there must be shared comfort.

I try hard to treat my twins as individuals – we do one-on-one time occasionally, they often choose to play separately, and they are both hitting social milestones in their own ways. But truly, their dynamic is a entity unto itself. The way we treat one twin is always affected by his brother. I’m starting to appreciate that individuality and twinship are not diametrically opposed. My boys’ powerful connection to each other is one of the most important things in their life and that’s really beautiful – something MORE than singleton, not less. I’m a lucky mom to be able to witness and support the unique way my twins love each other.

Is anyone else late to appreciate the twin connection? Are your toddlers surprising you as they choose to be more “twinny?” Twins with twin children, is it easier for you to understand your kids’ bond?

Mommy Brain

It’s a real thing, you guys. Mommy Brain. A disease whose onset begins during pregnancy for some, sets in after the birth of a child for others, but definitely progresses with every additional child, and is most acute during those children’s toddler years. If you have multiples, your form of this disease is most likely incurable.

I’ve always considered myself a very organized, in control kind of person. All through high school and college, I’ve always had my schoolwork together: a straight-A, AP class person others would admire. After starting work, things loosened up a bit, but the house would still be clean and picked up, the bills in order and paid.

However, Mommy Brain hit when the kids came. Having the first was not so bad. I remember several times losing my phone or leaving my wallet places when distracted by having to take care of someone other than myself (I always got them back). And a couple of times of driving all the way to Costco and realizing I didn’t have my wallet with me. Things like that.

But since the twins have been born, these incidences have begun to cost me money. The most serious example: I forgot to pay our December property tax after the twins were born in late November. I remembered the day after it was due, but it was too late. The penalty was something like $350. In retrospect I should have called and pleaded “Mommy Brain.” Probably wouldn’t have worked, but it would have been worth a shot. I could have gotten a woman at the other end who had experienced this disease as well.

I also lose everything these days. I had a bunch of Thank You cards printed for Big Sis’s birthday gifts, very cute ones that had her picture on it. They were in a Costco photo envelope along with some pictures of her and her siblings from the party. I had sent most of the Thank You cards, and brought the envelope to school with the intention of giving the photos to coworkers. Just as I was getting ready to hand out these photos, the envelope was nowhere to be found. Then when a couple of late birthday gifts came, and I had to reprint new Thank You cards. Eventually I found them in a bag with other stuff I packed when cleaning out my desk at school, but too late to give out the photos, and no need for the Thank You cards now. It would have almost been better not to have found them.

I lost a $25 Target gift card too. I’d been telling myself it’s not lost, and had even been looking for it a little bit every once in a while, but by now I’ve just got to accept that it’s gone. Somewhere between my car and the Target checkout line, it disappeared. Let’s not even mention all the receipts that have vanished into thin air. Luckily, most places can now look up purchases by running the credit card I used… if I could remember which one, or whether my husband was the one who paid. Hah!

I walk into rooms without remembering why I went into them. Then I spend a minute or two wandering the house, trying to remember, before something, or more likely somekid distracts me again. The house is a mess, stacks of papers everywhere, and even with all this summer vacation time at home, there hasn’t been much I could do about it.

Most recently I forgot to pay my car registration. It was due in April, but since they send that renewal 3 months in advance, I squirreled it away somewhere and totally forgot about it until I got the delinquent bill at the end of May. By then the penalty was $174. To add insult to injury, just a couple days before my new tags arrived in the mail, I got a parking ticket for expired tags. $55.

It’s a good thing most of our bills are on autopay. I really can’t afford to have Mommy Brain anymore!

lunchldyd is a soon-to-be part time high school teacher and mother to 18mo b/g twins and their 4yo sister. She is working on putting her organizational skills to use so she could avoid more financial repercussions. Perhaps a board of some sort…

Twinfant Tuesday: Going Back to Work After Maternity Leave (Part IV)

8 tips for making the return to work successful, from an IT professional and mother of twins.

Tips for Making a Return to Work Easier

Here are a few things that I think kept me from throwing up my hands and quitting my job in the first week back.

  1. A supportive co-parent. I trusted my husband completely with the babies. He had been present for them in their NICU-bound first days in ways I couldn’t after a C-section. Although he didn’t see the need for it, he agreed to stay home from work my first two days back, just in case the babies refused to feed from a bottle or I just couldn’t make the breast pump work for me.
  2. Research. I read up on the psychology of children raised by working mothers. I can’t find the articles I read back in 2006 now, but the ones that gave me the most comfort fell into two categories. There were the findings that showed that children of working mothers got just as much quality time from them as from stay-at-home moms, which countered my concerns that my children would be or feel neglected. There were also articles that argued that working moms were generally happier than stay-at-home moms. Having been diagnosed with clinical depression myself and having been raised by a mother with untreated mental illness, I knew how important it was to take care of myself so that I could be the best mother possible.
  3. A job I love. There would have been no point in returning to work if I didn’t enjoy what I did. I loved (and still love) the challenges, the pace, and above all my wonderfully smart, funny, supportive co-workers (including RachelG). I enjoyed my job so much that I went back to it even though my take home pay after daycare costs was about $100/month. Fortunately, I was awarded a promotion not long afterward, but I enjoyed work enough that it wasn’t about the money. If I were just working to make ends meet, I can imagine being deeply unhappy.
  4. A great boss. My team lead, Gordana, was breastfeeding her own infant when I came back to work. She was both a professional and a mothering mentor. She made sure that I had a place to pump and made me feel at ease making my breastfeeding needs known and respected. When J went on nursing strike, it was Gordana who recommended that I take some time off work to spend full days skin-to-skin with J to coax her back to the breast.
  5. Trusted caregivers. My daughters’ infant teacher, Suzanne, has become family. From the moment she met them, she loved my daughters as her own. She always told me what was going on with them, worked as a partner to address her concerns and mine, and gave insightful recommendations from her experience with infants. Every day, I was given a sheet of paper for each child documenting every meal, nap, diaper, activity, and event of the day. I trusted her, and still trust her, completely. She was actually the one who recommended the elementary school my daughters now attend, from which her own daughter is about to move onto middle school. When my girls (along with their friend Shaw) graduated from pre-K at their daycare centre, Suzanne cried as hard as I did.
  6. Established breastfeeding. The 8 weeks my girls and I had together 24/7 showed me that we could make breastfeeding work. I didn’t mind supplementing their diets with formula, but I was committed to getting them as many of the benefits of breastmilk as possible. Had we not been going strong with breastfeeding already, I’m not sure I could have made it through each workday without my babies at my side.
  7. Confidence. I had to be certain that I was doing the right thing. There were going to be naysayers feeding into my own doubts. I told myself that my working was the right choice for my family, and no one else could possibly decide for us how our family should be structured. I’ve never been one to follow the expected path, so that part came easily.
  8. Lowered standards. The fact is that an adult who spends 12 hours in their home can get less done with regards to housekeeping and cooking than one who is home 22-24 hours a day. Laundry didn’t get folded. It just didn’t. I used cleaning robots (Roomba and Scooba) to clean my floors because I couldn’t do it. We hired a lawn maintenance company because even if I were home during daylight hours, there was no way I was doing yard work. And I didn’t sit. I was in constant motion that first year. The first time I sat down outside of work and breastfeeding was when the babies were 6 months old and we went to Washington and were surrounded by doting grandparents, great grandmothers and great uncles and great aunts. I sat down and had a glass of wine with my mother-in-law while Grampy fed the babies. It was amazing.

Proud Grandpa displaying his grandtwins at the fire station

What are/were your concerns about returning to work?

Read more:

Sadia (rhymes with Nadia) has been coordinating How Do You Do It? since late 2012. She is the single mother of 8-year-old monozygotic twins, M and J. She lives with them and their 3 cats in the Austin, TX suburbs and works full time as a business analyst. She retired her personal blog, Double the Fun, but now also blogs at Adoption.com and Multicultural Mothering.

How do you do it? Parenting Link Up #28

Skip to this week’s links | Skip to featured posts | Skip to linkup rules

Welcome to the How Do You Do It? parenting link up party. Here, you have an opportunity to share your posts with other parent bloggers and the followers of How Do You Do It? and What’s up Fagans?.

How do you do it? is a community of mothers of multiples that believes in supporting each other, in sharing our experiences and questions, in friendship, and in encouragement. The link up is open to all of our readers, whether you have multiples or not, where you can share your wisdom, your favorite posts, your insights, with our online community here at HDYDI and What’s up Fagans?.

Each week, we pick some of our favorite posts and feature them the following week on our site! Plus, we pin them on Pinterest, tweet them on Twitter, and share them on Google+ and Facebook! Get some more exposure for your great content, and don’t forget to check out the featured posts from last week’s link up!

Plus, ldskatelyn of What’s up Fagans? is co-hosting our link party on her blog as well. One party on two blogs means double the exposure and community.

Each HDYDI parenting link up party accepts new links from Monday morning through Friday at noon.

So tell us: How do you handle conception, pregnancy, prematurity, birth, and postpartum recovery? How do you handle tantrums, diapering bills, stress, and potty training? How do you handle education and special needs? How do you balance the needs of several children with a marriage? How do you manage being a stay-at-home mom, a working mom, or a single parent? And how do you find time for yourself?

How do you do it?!


This week’s featured posts:

DayOur most clicked link was from Carolyn of A Lavendar Life where she describes the 8 Stages of Stay at Home Motherhood. A quick and funny read for sure! Can you relate?

PictureHannah of Foundations: Parent and Life Coaching is battling the summer boredom calls with a Summer Fun Jar! She has ideas for two different jars – One for the family, and one for activities her boys can do at home.

Annie from Motherhood and More shares her list of 10 Things New Moms Should Know about Motherhood. Her list is pretty awesome though slightly different form mine. What 10 things would you tell new moms now that you’ve been at it a while? Oh, and her breastfeeding posts have totally been going viral this last week!

If you were featured above make sure to grab our featured button and display it proudly on your blog! How Do You Do It? Featured Post

<a href="http://hdydi.com/features/hdydi-parenting-link-party/"><img alt="How Do You Do It? Featured Post" src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/hdydi-link-up-featured-badge.jpg" height="125" width="125"></a>

Parenting Link Up PartyRules for the How Do You Do It? Parenting Link Up Party:

  1. Follow and connect with HDYDI on the social media platforms that you use. Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Google+ | Blog Lovin
  2. Follow and connect with What’s up Fagans? on the social media platforms you use: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Google+ | Blog Lovin’
  3. Follow the How do you do it? Parenting Link Up Board on Pinterest where we pin every link shared!
  4. Link up to 3 great parenting posts below! Please, no recipes posts! Of course, link directly to a post, not your main page. Also, under “name” put the title of your post.
  5. Check out at least 3 other links! This is a party, so mingle!
  6. Leave an awesome comment for those you visit and tell them you found them at the HDYDI link party! And pin them/share the posts that you really like.
  7. Tweet: Add YOUR #parenting #advice to @hdydi's #linkup! Tell everyone #howdoyoudoit! http://ctt.ec/LRfWz+ #motherhood #momwisdomTweet about the link party, pin our link party badge, share it on Facebook, or otherwise promote this party! The more the party grows, the more exposure your posts will receive, the more fun you’ll have, and the more encouragement and ideas we’ll all receive!
  8. HDYDI Parenting Link Up PartyPut How Do You Do It?‘s Parenting Link Up badge on your site! Put it in your side bar, at the bottom of the post you shared, or on a party page!
    <a href="http://hdydi.com/features/hdydi-parenting-link-party/"><img alt="How Do You Do It? Parenting Link Up Party" src="http://hdydi.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/hdydi-link-party-9-.jpg" height="125" width="125"></a>


EASY Last-Minute Father’s Day Ideas from the Kiddos

Our family isn’t big on purchased gifts, so my husband will not be getting the proverbial new tie for Father’s Day this weekend.  Instead, we’ll be making our now-traditional Father’s Day Top 10.

I started this in 2010, when our girls were 17 months old.  (How I wish I’d done it in 2009, when they were infants…but I wasn’t brave enough then to whip out the finger paint!)

The girls choose what color they’d like to use for their hand print, and these days, they sign their names, too.  Then we work on a one-of-a-kind list, citing the Top 10 Reasons We Have the Best Daddy in the World.

DSC_0130

This list is from 2010, and it includes things pertinent to that year, like “you make sure there is always more room for dirty diapers,” and, “you give the best shoulder rides.”

This year, the girls came up with things like, “you are the master of Jenga,” and, “you showed us how to milk a goat” [long story].

In addition to this piece for our family scrapbook, I came up with an idea for a fun picture gift, too.

FDay14I drew these conversation bubbles and directed the girls to fill them in.  They thought this was some kind of fun!  And tomorrow, on Father’s Day, I plan to get one of them holding these signs, with their daddy in between them.  I see the birth of a new tradition!

What are your plans for Father’s Day?  Any traditions at your house?

MandyE is mom to five-year old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.

 

Foodie Friday: Our Go-To Granola Recipe

A couple of years ago, a fellow twin mama published this granola recipe on her blog.  I make it frequently.  In fact, my kitchen feels a little empty if we don’t have something in the granola container.

granola

Our favorite way to eat granola…over Greek yogurt and fresh fruit!

My girls always help me make the granola, and I actually let them measure everything.  My sense is that the measurements don’t have to be super precise, which is a good thing with a couple of littles in the kitchen.

Here’s the recipe the way I make it (more or less):

4 cups old-fashioned oatmeal (uncooked)

1 cup shredded coconut

1/2 cup whole wheat flour or wheat germ

1/2 stick butter, melted

1/2 cup honey

1 Tbsp. (or so) of cinnamon

1/4-1/2 cup slivered almonds

Preheat oven to 250.  Mix oats, coconut, and wheat flour/germ.  Dump in butter and honey (enough to make it moist but not super sticky…add more honey if necessary).  Toss mixture in a greased 9×13″ glass baking dish.  Bake for about 2 hours, stirring every 30 minutes, until golden brown.

I’ve never added anything else, but if you’d like dried fruit, like raisins or cranberries, or chocolate chips in your granola, add them after baking.

If I’m making this just for our family, I usually make 1/2 a recipe.  We LOVE this over Greek yogurt in the mornings.  (And this mama loves it over ice cream — with a little chocolate syrup — after the girls are in bed!)  This also makes a great gift (and looks super-cute in a pretty mason jar).

MandyE is mom to five-year old fraternal twin girls.  She blogs about their adventures, and her journey through motherhood, at Twin Trials and Triumphs.