Make-It Mondays: Dresser/Changer Redo

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When we started planning the nursery, we knew that we needed a few key pieces of furniture. Unfortunately, the big ticket items typically come with a big price tag. Still, we did our research and put realistic budgets for those items: cribs, changing table, and rocker/glider. This is the story of our dresser.

Dresser Redo - Doyle Dispatch

We gave ourselves a budget of $700 for the dresser, and I immediately started looking. I wanted to see what was out there before we bought something. I loved the idea of getting a dresser in a second-hand store and redoing it, but I was unsure if I would be happy with a used pieces of furniture for this piece. It had to be not only good-looking, but functional as well.

For about a week, I was thinking of taking a trip up to Ikea, where they have some moderately-priced dressers that I could easily use for  a changing table (about $300-400). This would still get me under-budget, even if I wanted to replace the handles with a more nautical-themed pull (which I did).

Then, one Friday morning as I lay in bed looking at the Facebook page of my favorite second-hand store Class and Trash, this popped up on my phone:

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

WHA???!!!! First of all, look at that dresser! 10 drawers: 4 of them are small and 6 large ones. It has a bit of style to it, perfect for a beachy decor. Then, look at the price. $100!!!????!!!!???? How can that be? There MUST be something wrong with it. Wait, there is: a missing pull. I didn’t care, because I was going to replace them anyway.

Well, the way that Class and Trash works is that you can comment on the picture to tell everyone else in a nice way to back off, because this is yours. The shop doesn’t consider it to be yours unless you call them (which I did at 7:10 AM, even though they didn’t open until 10) and pay for it. So, I made sure to get ready and be there when they opened at 10. I made a b line for the dresser, which seemed to have golden rays streaming out from it.

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

I opened all of the drawers, and I found that they all worked perfectly. So easy! It felt like it was brand new! So then I quickly walked (waddled?) over to the front counter to claim the dresser as mine. I didn’t want anyone else getting my gem. I told them my name, and they said, “Didn’t you just call about that dresser? Great! I won’t have to call you back.” Yes, I was a liiiiiittle anxious for my dream dresser.

In order to save $50 on delivery, Tim came with me the next day to pick it up in his car. It fit perfectly.

Next: shopping for drawer pulls.Remember that I had a $700 budget for the dresser, so I didn’t have to go cheap for the pulls. I had been looking online to see what I liked, and I realized that Anthropologie has some amazing pulls in their stores. They are a little expensive, but I still had $600 in the budget.

We then pulled out (pun intended) one of each of the pulls that we liked and looked at them together. These are only some of them:

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

We then pulled out our favorites:

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

We had a hard time deciding, but we ended up liking two styles. So, we bought 10 of each of them, figuring that we would try out one of each style, and return the 10 “rejects.” Now, why not just buy one of each? Well, we didn’t want to pick out the one we liked, only to come back and find out we couldn’t get 10 of them. It was easier just to spend the money up front and then return them in a day or two.

So, once we got home, we got a drawer out and tried to two favorites:

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

We decided that, although we were in love with the old-looking style of the mother-of-pearl/bronze, there was something so whimsical about the bubble glass. So, bubble glass it was:

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

After that, the only thing left was to get painting supplies for the dresser. I knew that I wanted to use Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, because I just had fallen in love with her line.

I was unsure of which color I needed, because I wanted it to match perfectly with the cribs we had ordered from Pottery Barn. Luckily, PB Kids (and I’m sure PB does this too) will sell you a wood sample of their colors, so you can match it to other furniture items. The saleslady explained that you can have it for 30 days and then return it for a full refund. Perfect!

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

So, with my wooden sample in our crib color in hand, I took a trip up to Thrill of the Hunt in Ashland to get my paint. The salesman was very helpful, and he got me hooked up with something to clean and prep the dresser for painting, the paint, and the clear wax coating.

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

Now, all we had to do was find a free weekend to paint. Easier said than done.

Fast forward about 3 weeks, and we finally had a weekend where we weren’t traveling to be with family or planning/throwing a bridal shower.

Tim, being the amazingly protective daddy-to-be, didn’t want me to use the furniture prep, so he rubbed that whole dresser down, including all 10 of the drawers. Then after a short drying time, it was ready to paint!

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

The pictures above make the dresser look like it was already a great shade of white, and if we weren’t oh-so-picky, it would have been fine. It did, however, have a distressed and slightly dirty look to it, and I knew that some white paint would clean that baby right up.

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

Because Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is low VOC, it is safe for preggos to paint using it. Woohoo! I really didn’t want to just stand back and let Tim have all the fun, so I’m glad I got to get my hands dirty too. Literally. My hands did get dirty. I’m not the cleanest of painters, but I do have fun!

Dresser Redo - The Doyle Dispatch

 

I was amazed at the difference in colors after just one swipe with the brush.

Well, two coats of paint later, and a bit of wax to make it un-chalky and more of a shiny, glossy finish, and our dresser was completed!

Then, duh, duh, DUUUUUUUUH… we go to attach the pulls and discover that the 10 that we originally bought weren’t enough. Yes, we have 10 drawers. The four top drawers just need one pull. The bottom 6, however, need 2 pulls. So, we actually need 16 pulls total. Oh no!

So, off we go to Anthropologie to get our extra pulls. They didn’t have any in the store, so we went ahead and ordered them. We got 10 more (although we only needed 6), just in case some broke or we wanted a different look, since they are all unique.

Here the run-down on the final cost:

Dresser: $105.94
Pulls: $84.24
Pulls (2nd Round): $84.20
(I don’t know why it cost less to get the 2nd group of 10)
Pottery Barn Paint Chip: $21.06 (returnable)
Chalk Paint: $71.88

Total: $346.26 ($367.32 with paint chip)

Not too bad, considering the fact that we were $353.74 UNDER budget!

Dresser Redo (Final) - DoyleDispatch.com

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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MiM: Bath Time Towel Apron

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DIY Bath Time Towel Apron by DoyleDispatch.comOk, so you’ve seen these on Pinterest: the towels that look like aprons that you can use for bath time. So cute!

And if you have heard stories about my Papa Alan, you probably also know that we have the largest collection of hotel towels in the world (because he always brought us these towels as a sign that he was leaving town).

So, what do you do with these extra towels? Make a bath time towel apron for Baby Boy and Baby Girl!

Steps:

1. Lay out your towel as flat as possible.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

2. Lay out an apron that you like on top of it. I used one of my Thirty-One aprons (don’t the patterns just make you so happy?)

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

3. Fold over both the towel and apron in half. This will help you so that you only have to cut once, and it will stay symmetrical.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

4. Cut out the top portion like so.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

5. I found that I needed the top to angle in a little bit more, so I did a bit more trimming.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

6. Cut out a length of fabric (the width is your choice) to fit on the top of the apron. This is just for decoration. The wider section will be sewed onto the front, and the thinner section is sewed onto the back.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

Fold over the sides onto the back.

 

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

The back will look like this when it is pinned:

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

The front looks like this when pinned:

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

7. Cut out two long strips of colorful fabric. Make them as long as you can. You will want them to be about 3 inches wide.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

7. Fold the edges over and iron to form creases.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

8. Fold both sections over and sew onto your towel apron. This will be the underarms and the ties.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

9. Sew on some ribbon (or rickrack) to tie it around your neck.

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

10. Enjoy your towel apron! If you have girl/boy twins like me, you will want to make a second one (not pictured) so that the second bather won’t be stuck with a wet towel. You can call me a thoughtful mom!

DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com
DIY Bath Time Towel Apron (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

Feeling ambitious? You can also add some pockets at the bottom to hold some bathing goodies.

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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MiM: Nautical Nursery Reveal and DIY List

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I shared my twins’ nursery on my own personal blog last month, but I am so excited to share it with the HDYDI readers too! This was certainly a labor of love- full of imagination, budgeting, hard work, many DIY projects, countless tutorials (both reading and writing of them), and many late nights of work after my husband got home from work. We finally finished it, with enough time before our little peanuts arrived to just sit back and enjoy our work. I hope you like it too!

If you want to see the entire post on my personal blog (and individual pictures), please go to: http://doyledispatch.com/house-tour/nursery/

Below the pictures, you will see a source list and my DIY list. I was really fortunate to have the time to do a lot of crafts myself. While I sometimes overspent on fabric or notions, I knew that I had underspent in other categories, which allowed me a bit of freedom for a slightly more flexible budget.

If you have any questions at all, please ask away!  Twin Nautical Nursery - DoyleDispatch.com

 

 

Twin Nautical Nursery - DoyleDispatch.com

 

 

Twin Nautical Crib Skirt Detail - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Crib Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Changing Table Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nursery Vintage Stuffed Animals - DoyleDispatch.com

Nautical Nursery DIY Art - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nursery Shelves Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Additional Twin Nautical Nursery Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Nautical Nursery Glider Corner Details - DoyleDispatch.com - DoyleDispatch.com

Source List:

Cribs: Kendall Crib in Simply White from Pottery Barn Kids

Paint: Gray Owl by Benjamin Moore (Room Color), Painted by B. Lilly Custom Painting
Stonington Gray by Benjamin Moore (Closet Color), self-painted

Changing Table: second-hand dresser found at Class and Trash, pulls from Anthropologie (Glass Bubble Knob in Blue), chalk paint and wax from Thrill of the Hunt (Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Pure White and Clear Wax)

Bookcase: Billy Bookcase in White from IKEA

Wall Bookcases: BEKVAM Spice Rack from IKEA, painted in white chalk paint

Glider and Ottoman: Newco Premium Rosie Glider and Ottoman in Otter Velvet from Babies R Us

Closet: Lowe’s

Fan: CN52W5 Copeland Unipack 52″ Ceiling Fan in White from Craftmade Lighting (Amazon)

Window Bench: Colebrook Bench in White and Colebrook Cushion in Denim from Company Store

Curtains: Material from UFab, sewn by Marcia Perkins

Curtain Rods: Sheffield Rods and Brackets and Crackle Glass Finials by Country Curtains

Curtain Tie-back: Shoreline Marine Galvanized Cleats in Cast Iron from Shoreline Marine (Amazon) – purchased but not installed

Floating Shelving: Home Depot

Oars: Attwood Wood Canoe Paddle (Amazon)

Closet Knobs: Streamline Knob in Zinc from Anthropologie

Lamp: Created by Lamp Emporium

Vintage Nautical Prints: My Grandest Adventure

Sailboat Mirror: Pottery Barn Kids

Boat Diaper Station: Pottery Barn Kids

Scentsy Warmer: Sarah’s Signature Scents (Independent Scentsy Consultant)

 

DIY Projects:
Starfish pillow (on window bench)
Seahorse pillow (on window bench)
Sea urchin pillow (on window bench)
Nautical mobiles
Dragonfly pillow (on glider)
Crib skirts
Flamingo plush (in Baby Girl’s crib)
Octopus plush (in Baby Boy’s crib)
Cabbage Patch doll pillowcase dress (on shelf)
Shell collection collage (above glider)
Nautical knots collage (above glider)
Ruler growth chart (next to closet)
Shower cards booklet
Pacifier holders
Shower wrapping paper blocks (not pictured)
Mystery foam block (not pictured)
Assorted blankets and playtime quilts (not pictured)

 

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MiM: Pacifier Clip

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Easy DIY Pacifier Clips - DoyleDispatch.com

I have a lot of extra fabric just sitting around my craft room. I mean… a lot. So, I thought I would start doing some smaller projects to help get rid of my stash. Enjoy this tutorial!

1. Start by laying out your fabric and ironing it.
DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cut your fabric so that it is 15″ long and just under 4″ wide (mine was 3 and 7/8 inches wide).

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

3. Fold the fabric in half lengthwise (hotdog style) and iron to create a crease.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

4. Unfold to show the underside and the crease.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

5. Fold one side towards the center crease and iron.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

6. Fold the other side towards the center crease and iron. Make sure they do not get folded all the way to the crease.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

7. Fold the end over and iron to form a crease. Do this on both ends.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

8. Fold down the center crease again and iron the entire piece flat.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

9. Sew around the entire rectangle.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

10. Clip any hanging threads. Make sure that everything is secure.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.comDIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

 

11. Open your package of suspender/mitten clips.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

12. Fold one of the ends through the clip, leaving about 1 inch of material as a “tail.” Sew it.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

13. Sew the rest of the “tail” down to secure. The pictures below show the back and front.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.comDIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

14. Identify your snaps (left: male, right: female, not pictured: prongs). I always have trouble figuring out which is the back side and which is the correct side of the female part of the snap. Some people talk about the part the sticks up, but the snaps that I use don’t have an easily-identified side like this. I’ve finally figured it out, though. There is a side that looks like flower petals inside. That is the “correct” side of the snap, and the other side is the backside that will attach to the prongs.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.comDIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

15. Using your snap attacher (I’ve used a few, and I prefer the SnapSetter tool), attach the snaps so that there is a little fold-over.

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

16. There you go! One pacifier clip ready to go!

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com

You can tell that I got on a roll and made a few. Once you make one, you will realize how easy it is. What a great baby shower gift!

DIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.comDIY Pacifier Holder - DoyleDispatch.com




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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Make-It Mondays: Side Tie Pillow

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One of the things that I wanted to make for the nursery was a pillow to add a touch of color to our dark gray glider. I had delayed on making this, as I really didn’t know what material I wanted for it.

Then one day, I made a pillow for a dear friend for her classroom. I didn’t start with a plan for her pillow, except that I wanted to incorporate butterflies into it. This is what I came up with for her:

 Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

I was very happy with it, and I realized that I could do something similar for our pillow. We wanted to have a butterfly on it as well (for a personal touch), as well as a dragonfly. I chatted with Tim about the style and colors, and we decided that we wanted a splash of color, but we didn’t want the whole thing to be a bright color. I would then make an appliqué of a dragonfly for the front of the pillow. Here is our step-by-step to make a 16″ x 16″ pillow:

Materials

  • 1 yard of fabric
  • 1 fat quarter of a contrasting fabric
  • fat quarters (or small scraps) of other materials to make your appliqué
  • iron-on adhesive for the appliqué
  • Velcro or ribbon to close the pillow

 Steps

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Cut your main fabric to 17.5″ x 24″.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Cut your fat quarter (contrasting fabric) to 17.5″ x 10″.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Put the two types of fabric together so the “good” sides are facing each other.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Sew them together.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Take the other two unlike ends and sew together. It will create a loop.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Iron the hems flat in one direction.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Sew one of the sides together. You will now have 3 sides of the pillow sewn.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

On the 4th side (that is still open), fold the unfinished edge down and sew a hem around the whole pillow.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Turn the pillow so it is right-side out. Iron all of the seams so they are crisp lines. Sew around the 3 closed sides of the pillow.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

A note about the appliqué: If you are going to add this, I would actually recommend doing this before you sew the pieces together. I didn’t add the appliqué until this point because I wanted to be able to see the pillow put together first and look at spacing. It made it harder to sew, because I was working around the seams, but I also could put the appliqué exactly where I wanted it.

Using an iron-on adhesive (I use Heat n Bond Lite), attach the adhesive to the back of your fabric and cut out your pieces (follow the directions from the adhesive). You can just iron-on the appliqué to your pillow, but chances are this will not stay for long. I had to follow up later with a zig-zag stitch around the dragonfly and butterfly to make sure the appliqués stayed in place.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Figure out how you want to close your pillow. I started by having lots of ribbons to tie into bows, but I then decided to go back and add velcro as well, because it will keep it more secure in the long run.

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Here are some closeups of the appliqués after I stitched around the edges. They aren’t perfect, but they will do!

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

As I mentioned above, I decided to take off the ties and turn the side pocket into a velcro closure. Well, I put velcro on the whole size, and it made for a very lop-sided looking pillow:

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

So, I took cut off the velcro on the top and bottom parts of the pillow so that the corners were a bit more natural. Much better!

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

Enjoy your finished pillow!

Side-Tie Pillow - DoyleDispatch.com

 

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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Make-It Mondays: Crib Skirts

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DIY Crib Skirt Tutorial - DoyleDispatch.com

Well, we knew that one of the focal features of the room would be the cribs. Why? Well, when you walk into the room… BAM! The cribs are right in front of you. So, we knew that the cribs needed to have quite a bit of style.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

I fell in love with these Pottery Barn sheets, because, let’s face it, how can you not love those adorable ocean critters? Plus, I would be able to have Baby Boy’s crib match Baby Girl’s crib in the fabric pattern, but the colors would differ. Perfect!

Not so perfect. They were not available in the stores anymore. That’s okay, I’m sure someone will have them online! Well, that was true, as I could find them on Ebay. Unfortunately, they were quite a bit more expensive than if we had gotten them from PBK. Because these were focal points in the room, however, I was okay with a bit of a splurge.

Now, we needed the crib skirts! If we looked on Pottery Barn Kids, we saw that they had these adorable matching crib skirts. They were simple, tailored, and adorable! The only problem was that they were $59 each! Now, if that was just for one crib, I could understand. For us having to do 2 cribs? No way!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

So I went online and found some easy DIY tutorials for the crib skirts. After all, they ARE just rectangles of fabric! Done! I’ll make my own!

Well, after I made that decision, I kept looking to find the best pattern for the skirts. Did I want a pleat? Did I want to keep it easy and just make it flat? Do we attach them with velcro or ribbon? Do I make all 4 sides attach together with a muslin that lies underneath the mattress, or do I make it adjustable for when we lower the crib mattress as the babies grow?

So, I decided that I wanted 2 colors (similar to the picture from PBK), and I would attach them with ribbons to the mattress springs (that ended up changing to velcro). So, I went off to my favorite local fabric store, Quilting Adventures. They are incredible there at helping to decide colors, matching fabrics, and advice for construction. They even let me come back with Tim to use their huge cutting mats and tables so I could prep all of my pieces.

We made some mistakes in the amounts of fabric, but in the interest of this tutorial, I will spare you those details, and instead I will pretend like I did it correct the first time.

Items needed:

3 yards of main fabric if about 45″ wide

2 yards of border fabric if about 45″ wide (you will have lots of this left over, but you need the length to construct the piece correctly)

10 yards of wide rickrack (the wavy “ribbon”)

Thread to match each color fabric used

Cut-able velcro (one side sticky, one side sewable)

Sewing machine, rotary cutter, pins, iron, ruler, and other sewing necessities

 

Steps:

1. Pick out your fabric. Hopefully you have someplace as amazing as Quilting Adventures to help with this step (or some crafty friends to bounce ideas off of).

2.  Measure your crib and figure out how much you will need of each fabric. Note: these measurements are NOT the cribs themselves, but the mattress base, where you will attach the skirts. The following measurements are based off of our cribs (Pottery Barn Kendall cribs):

Crib mattress length/finished length: 51″
Length with 4″ added due to pleating: 55″
Length with seam allowance added: 57″

Crib mattress width/finished width: 26″
Width with 4″ added due to pleating: 30″
Width with seam allowance added: 32″

Height of main fabric: 18.5″ final, 20″ including seam allowance

Height of border fabric: 4″ final, 6″ including seam allowance

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

Please note: This picture has incorrect measurements, though it was extremely helpful in figuring out how much of each fabric I would need.

3. Cut the fabric according to your crib.

Short side:
2 sections of solid blue 6″ x 32″ *
2 sections of cross-hatch blue 20″ x 32″ *

Long side:
2 sections of solid blue 6″ x 57″ *
2 sections of cross-hatch blue 20″ x 57″ *

*Repeat with pink versions

4. Line up the right-sides of the fabric together, and sew each of the the solid borders to the patterned pieces. These will create your 4 main pieces that will be the sides for your crib.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

5. Iron the seams to one side.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

6. Measure out 4″ from the seam that connects the two fabrics together. I have this nifty tool that allows you to line up and measure easily. I highly recommend getting it if you like exact measurements!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

7. Pin and sew the bottom hem. If you have lots of extra fabric like I did, trim off the excess.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

8. This is a good time to go back to your cribs and make sure you know exactly how much room you have from the mattress to the floor. Measure carefully. This will tell you how much of a finished piece you need. Pin, iron flat, and sew the top hem for the skirt. I was able to fold the fabric 0.5″ down, and I sewed a .25″ seam allowance.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

9. Pin, iron flat, and sew the side hems for the skirt. You do not need to measure here, as you can fix any issue when you create your pleats.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

10. Measure your current finished skirt. It should be longer than you need length-wise, but the height should be exact from mattress to floor. Mark the length of each section. You will then need to do a little math:

[Length of the fabric skirt section] – [Length of the mattress] = P

P stands for Amount of Material Leftover for Pleats

Then do: P / 4 = L

L stands for Amount For Each Section of the Pleats

So, as an example, we had a finished length of the fabric skirt section of 55.75″. We subtracted the length of the mattress (51″). We then divided that by 4 to equal 1 1/8. So, each section of the pleats needed to be 1 and 1/8 inch long.

11. Fold the skirt in half to find the center. Mark it with a pin. Using your ruler, measure out 1 and 1/8 inches (or whatever your “L” is), and mark it with a pin. You will need to have 5 pins total, making 4 different sections.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

12. Now, you have to do some folding and ironing. Use the pins to mark the fold lines and create an accordion fold with the fabric. Pin in place. Use your iron to make creases that go down the entire height of the fabric.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

13. Sew the top of the pleat.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

14. Change your thread color to white and sew on the rickrack over the seam that separates the two fabrics.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

15. On the ends, fold over and sew the ends of the rickrack to the back of the fabric.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

16. Iron the skirt to make it crisp and clean.

17. Attach velcro to the top of the crib skirt and to the crib itself. For the shorter sections, I used 3 pieces of 2″ velcro. For the longer sides, I used 5 pieces of 2″ velcro. Attach to the crib and enjoy your skirts!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

Hints and Tips:

When dealing with rickrack or ribbon, I learned that you can run a flame quickly underneath the unfinished end of the ribbon. This will make sure it doesn’t fray.

You may find that (like me) you need to tack some spots of the pleats down, so you can keep that crisp look. It all depends on your material and how it lays flat. You may have to tack more on some spots than others.

Measure, measure, measure! I am anxious and I like to finish projects. Sometimes, I cut corners. This is one that will create far fewer headaches if you really measure well at first.

Don’t be afraid to diagram! Allow yourself to draw a diagram of how you want it to look. Start with the finished product and work backwards to add seam allowances. Planning in the beginning will save you time (and money) in the long-run.

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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Make-It Mondays: Halloween Pumpkin Playdoh

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Categories Activities, DIY, Make-It MondaysTags , 2 Comments

Welcome to the first official post in our new series, Make-It Mondays!

Make It Mondays Button HDYDI

Last year, in addition to the typical Halloween candy that we gave out, I wanted to do something else for the littlest ones that came to our house.

Yes, I wanted to be that cool house. You know the one. When I was growing up, it was the woman that owned the local Pepsi plant and gave us half-bottles of Pepsi products. She was the best, and we saved our visit to her house until last because we loved her so much!

I wanted to be the house that the kids said, “Remember Mrs. Doyle? She gave us the neatest ______.”

Well, last year, my creation was homemade Pumpkin Playdoh. And it was a hit with the little peanuts.

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I found the recipe on Pinterest here, and I just knew that I had to give this out (as well as candy, of course). It was surprisingly easy to make!

Ingredients for 28 Pumpkin Playdoh Bags

  • 4 Cups water
  • Orange food coloring (or combine yellow and red)
  • 4 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 Cup salt
  • 8 Tbsp. cream of tartar
  • 6 Tsp. pumpkin pie spice
  • 4 Cups of white flour

Assembly Instructions

In the pot.
Combine the ingredients.
Cooking.
Cook on medium heat for 3-5 minutes.
Clumpy.
It will get clumpy! Keep stirring while it cooks.
It looks much more like playdoh!
It looks much more like playdoh!
Cooling.
Put it in a bowl and let cool. At this point, the directions said to knead it for a few minutes, but it was much too warm.
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After letting it cool, I put it into balls and put in the bags. I let them breathe so there was no condensation inside the bags.
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Still a little condensation, but cool enough to continue on.
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Tie and attach the label. We don’t want them eating this, thinking it is a treat!

Now I have to figure out what I will be creating for this year. I only have a few days left. Eek! I really want to make some cute treat bags or homemade edible goodies like you see on Pinterest, but because of overly-cautious parents (of which I will totally be starting next year), we need for the food to be pre-packaged. Do you have any suggestions?

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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Make-It Mondays: Introduction

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Categories Activities, DIY, Make-It MondaysTags 3 Comments

Welcome to our first post in our new series “Make-It Mondays!”

Make It Mondays Button HDYDI

Each Monday, we will have tutorials for craft projects. Some of the projects will be for your peanuts, some will be to do with them, and some will just be other cute tutorials. They will be at varying levels of skills and with different mediums (sewing, glue guns, paper crafts, and many others), so we encourage you to ask questions by writing in the comments.

Have a request for us to feature a specific kind of project? Make sure to let us know as well! In addition, if you have found an online tutorial like one of the ones that we have, make sure to post a link in the comments as well. There are many different ways to do projects and get similar outcomes. I have found that some methods work better than others, so let’s share as much as we can to make it easier on us crafty (or not-so crafty) MOMs!

Today, we aren’t going to actually have a specific tutorial, since there are so many other great posts from today. We just wanted you to know that this is coming up. So leave a comment with your requests for tutorials!

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