MiM: Nautical Nursery Reveal and DIY List

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I shared my twins’ nursery on my own personal blog last month, but I am so excited to share it with the HDYDI readers too! This was certainly a labor of love- full of imagination, budgeting, hard work, many DIY projects, countless tutorials (both reading and writing of them), and many late nights of work after my husband got home from work. We finally finished it, with enough time before our little peanuts arrived to just sit back and enjoy our work. I hope you like it too!

If you want to see the entire post on my personal blog (and individual pictures), please go to: http://doyledispatch.com/house-tour/nursery/

Below the pictures, you will see a source list and my DIY list. I was really fortunate to have the time to do a lot of crafts myself. While I sometimes overspent on fabric or notions, I knew that I had underspent in other categories, which allowed me a bit of freedom for a slightly more flexible budget.

If you have any questions at all, please ask away!  Twin Nautical Nursery - DoyleDispatch.com

 

 

Twin Nautical Nursery - DoyleDispatch.com

 

 

Twin Nautical Crib Skirt Detail - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Crib Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Changing Table Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nursery Vintage Stuffed Animals - DoyleDispatch.com

Nautical Nursery DIY Art - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nursery Shelves Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Additional Twin Nautical Nursery Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Twin Nautical Nursery Details - DoyleDispatch.com

Nautical Nursery Glider Corner Details - DoyleDispatch.com - DoyleDispatch.com

Source List:

Cribs: Kendall Crib in Simply White from Pottery Barn Kids

Paint: Gray Owl by Benjamin Moore (Room Color), Painted by B. Lilly Custom Painting
Stonington Gray by Benjamin Moore (Closet Color), self-painted

Changing Table: second-hand dresser found at Class and Trash, pulls from Anthropologie (Glass Bubble Knob in Blue), chalk paint and wax from Thrill of the Hunt (Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Pure White and Clear Wax)

Bookcase: Billy Bookcase in White from IKEA

Wall Bookcases: BEKVAM Spice Rack from IKEA, painted in white chalk paint

Glider and Ottoman: Newco Premium Rosie Glider and Ottoman in Otter Velvet from Babies R Us

Closet: Lowe’s

Fan: CN52W5 Copeland Unipack 52″ Ceiling Fan in White from Craftmade Lighting (Amazon)

Window Bench: Colebrook Bench in White and Colebrook Cushion in Denim from Company Store

Curtains: Material from UFab, sewn by Marcia Perkins

Curtain Rods: Sheffield Rods and Brackets and Crackle Glass Finials by Country Curtains

Curtain Tie-back: Shoreline Marine Galvanized Cleats in Cast Iron from Shoreline Marine (Amazon) – purchased but not installed

Floating Shelving: Home Depot

Oars: Attwood Wood Canoe Paddle (Amazon)

Closet Knobs: Streamline Knob in Zinc from Anthropologie

Lamp: Created by Lamp Emporium

Vintage Nautical Prints: My Grandest Adventure

Sailboat Mirror: Pottery Barn Kids

Boat Diaper Station: Pottery Barn Kids

Scentsy Warmer: Sarah’s Signature Scents (Independent Scentsy Consultant)

 

DIY Projects:
Starfish pillow (on window bench)
Seahorse pillow (on window bench)
Sea urchin pillow (on window bench)
Nautical mobiles
Dragonfly pillow (on glider)
Crib skirts
Flamingo plush (in Baby Girl’s crib)
Octopus plush (in Baby Boy’s crib)
Cabbage Patch doll pillowcase dress (on shelf)
Shell collection collage (above glider)
Nautical knots collage (above glider)
Ruler growth chart (next to closet)
Shower cards booklet
Pacifier holders
Shower wrapping paper blocks (not pictured)
Mystery foam block (not pictured)
Assorted blankets and playtime quilts (not pictured)

 

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Make-It Mondays: Crib Skirts

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Categories DIY, Make-It MondaysTags , , , , , 1 Comment

DIY Crib Skirt Tutorial - DoyleDispatch.com

Well, we knew that one of the focal features of the room would be the cribs. Why? Well, when you walk into the room… BAM! The cribs are right in front of you. So, we knew that the cribs needed to have quite a bit of style.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

I fell in love with these Pottery Barn sheets, because, let’s face it, how can you not love those adorable ocean critters? Plus, I would be able to have Baby Boy’s crib match Baby Girl’s crib in the fabric pattern, but the colors would differ. Perfect!

Not so perfect. They were not available in the stores anymore. That’s okay, I’m sure someone will have them online! Well, that was true, as I could find them on Ebay. Unfortunately, they were quite a bit more expensive than if we had gotten them from PBK. Because these were focal points in the room, however, I was okay with a bit of a splurge.

Now, we needed the crib skirts! If we looked on Pottery Barn Kids, we saw that they had these adorable matching crib skirts. They were simple, tailored, and adorable! The only problem was that they were $59 each! Now, if that was just for one crib, I could understand. For us having to do 2 cribs? No way!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

So I went online and found some easy DIY tutorials for the crib skirts. After all, they ARE just rectangles of fabric! Done! I’ll make my own!

Well, after I made that decision, I kept looking to find the best pattern for the skirts. Did I want a pleat? Did I want to keep it easy and just make it flat? Do we attach them with velcro or ribbon? Do I make all 4 sides attach together with a muslin that lies underneath the mattress, or do I make it adjustable for when we lower the crib mattress as the babies grow?

So, I decided that I wanted 2 colors (similar to the picture from PBK), and I would attach them with ribbons to the mattress springs (that ended up changing to velcro). So, I went off to my favorite local fabric store, Quilting Adventures. They are incredible there at helping to decide colors, matching fabrics, and advice for construction. They even let me come back with Tim to use their huge cutting mats and tables so I could prep all of my pieces.

We made some mistakes in the amounts of fabric, but in the interest of this tutorial, I will spare you those details, and instead I will pretend like I did it correct the first time.

Items needed:

3 yards of main fabric if about 45″ wide

2 yards of border fabric if about 45″ wide (you will have lots of this left over, but you need the length to construct the piece correctly)

10 yards of wide rickrack (the wavy “ribbon”)

Thread to match each color fabric used

Cut-able velcro (one side sticky, one side sewable)

Sewing machine, rotary cutter, pins, iron, ruler, and other sewing necessities

 

Steps:

1. Pick out your fabric. Hopefully you have someplace as amazing as Quilting Adventures to help with this step (or some crafty friends to bounce ideas off of).

2.  Measure your crib and figure out how much you will need of each fabric. Note: these measurements are NOT the cribs themselves, but the mattress base, where you will attach the skirts. The following measurements are based off of our cribs (Pottery Barn Kendall cribs):

Crib mattress length/finished length: 51″
Length with 4″ added due to pleating: 55″
Length with seam allowance added: 57″

Crib mattress width/finished width: 26″
Width with 4″ added due to pleating: 30″
Width with seam allowance added: 32″

Height of main fabric: 18.5″ final, 20″ including seam allowance

Height of border fabric: 4″ final, 6″ including seam allowance

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

Please note: This picture has incorrect measurements, though it was extremely helpful in figuring out how much of each fabric I would need.

3. Cut the fabric according to your crib.

Short side:
2 sections of solid blue 6″ x 32″ *
2 sections of cross-hatch blue 20″ x 32″ *

Long side:
2 sections of solid blue 6″ x 57″ *
2 sections of cross-hatch blue 20″ x 57″ *

*Repeat with pink versions

4. Line up the right-sides of the fabric together, and sew each of the the solid borders to the patterned pieces. These will create your 4 main pieces that will be the sides for your crib.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

5. Iron the seams to one side.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

6. Measure out 4″ from the seam that connects the two fabrics together. I have this nifty tool that allows you to line up and measure easily. I highly recommend getting it if you like exact measurements!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

7. Pin and sew the bottom hem. If you have lots of extra fabric like I did, trim off the excess.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

8. This is a good time to go back to your cribs and make sure you know exactly how much room you have from the mattress to the floor. Measure carefully. This will tell you how much of a finished piece you need. Pin, iron flat, and sew the top hem for the skirt. I was able to fold the fabric 0.5″ down, and I sewed a .25″ seam allowance.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

9. Pin, iron flat, and sew the side hems for the skirt. You do not need to measure here, as you can fix any issue when you create your pleats.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

10. Measure your current finished skirt. It should be longer than you need length-wise, but the height should be exact from mattress to floor. Mark the length of each section. You will then need to do a little math:

[Length of the fabric skirt section] – [Length of the mattress] = P

P stands for Amount of Material Leftover for Pleats

Then do: P / 4 = L

L stands for Amount For Each Section of the Pleats

So, as an example, we had a finished length of the fabric skirt section of 55.75″. We subtracted the length of the mattress (51″). We then divided that by 4 to equal 1 1/8. So, each section of the pleats needed to be 1 and 1/8 inch long.

11. Fold the skirt in half to find the center. Mark it with a pin. Using your ruler, measure out 1 and 1/8 inches (or whatever your “L” is), and mark it with a pin. You will need to have 5 pins total, making 4 different sections.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

12. Now, you have to do some folding and ironing. Use the pins to mark the fold lines and create an accordion fold with the fabric. Pin in place. Use your iron to make creases that go down the entire height of the fabric.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

13. Sew the top of the pleat.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

14. Change your thread color to white and sew on the rickrack over the seam that separates the two fabrics.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

15. On the ends, fold over and sew the ends of the rickrack to the back of the fabric.

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

16. Iron the skirt to make it crisp and clean.

17. Attach velcro to the top of the crib skirt and to the crib itself. For the shorter sections, I used 3 pieces of 2″ velcro. For the longer sides, I used 5 pieces of 2″ velcro. Attach to the crib and enjoy your skirts!

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

 

DIY Crib Skirts with Pleat (Tutorial) - DoyleDispatch.com

Hints and Tips:

When dealing with rickrack or ribbon, I learned that you can run a flame quickly underneath the unfinished end of the ribbon. This will make sure it doesn’t fray.

You may find that (like me) you need to tack some spots of the pleats down, so you can keep that crisp look. It all depends on your material and how it lays flat. You may have to tack more on some spots than others.

Measure, measure, measure! I am anxious and I like to finish projects. Sometimes, I cut corners. This is one that will create far fewer headaches if you really measure well at first.

Don’t be afraid to diagram! Allow yourself to draw a diagram of how you want it to look. Start with the finished product and work backwards to add seam allowances. Planning in the beginning will save you time (and money) in the long-run.

*Part of this post originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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Make-It Mondays: Nursery Mood Board and Layout

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When I was starting to plan our nursery, I had an idea of what I wanted the nursery to look like. Then we found out the wonderful news that we were having twins, and I started to worry that we wouldn’t be able to have everything we wanted in our nursery. That’s when my planning came out. I created a mood board and a layout to try to plan my visions:

Mood Board

For our nursery, we’re going nautical!

I am so absolutely 100% excited about this theme. It is cutesy, but we are able to tie in the vintage, old-world looks that we love. We don’t want the room to scream “BEACH!” nor do we want it to be just a boring room. It is hard to picture the idea of a “vintage nautical nursery with whimsical touches” that is appropriate for a boy and a girl twin, especially when I mention that it will have gray walls, with navy blue, pink, and aqua accents.

So what’s a girl to do?

MOOD BOARD!

Nautical Nursery Mood Board Pic

This is my first, by the way. So, what do you think? Can you get a better idea of the look we want?

*If you want to make a mood board yourself, you only need to use your favorite digital writing program, like Word or Pages. I prefer Pages (I’m an Apple girl all the way), because I love how I am able to manipulate the text and pictures. Add in some text boxes and pictures. If you want to add some more color, you can add some rectangles with different borders. Just play a bit and use the pictures you like. You really can’t go wrong!*

Layout

Before I found out I was pregnant, we had reserved our old office as the nursery. There was a lot of back-and-forth between Tim and me, deciding whether we wanted to use the big, old office space as a nursery or one of the two smaller rooms. Tim thought that we really could use our small space (my craft room) as a nursery, but I thought that it would be better to have more space to use the nursery also as a playroom.

Well, then we found out it was twins, and there was no question: the large, old office was now the nursery.

Here is the architectural layout (made via Icovia Room Planner):

Nursery Room Layout

There are 4 windows: 3 smaller windows along the far wall and a larger window in an alcove on the side. There is also a door to the walk-up attic along the right wall. The closet isn’t as large as it appears on the layout, but that was all I could do with the room planner software via Pottery Barn.

So, after lots of thinking and planning and remeasuring and experimenting with tape, we figured out how we wanted the room to be situated.

We will have the two cribs on the far wall between the windows. The changing table will be on the same wall as the door, as will the glider/ottoman. We will put a narrow bookshelf opposite the attic door. If we can fit it, we will put a window seat/bench in the large window alcove. Hopefully everything will fit!

Nursery Layout with Furniture

And now, some actual pictures of the room with tape on the floors:

Nursery Room Layout - Doyle Dispatch

 

Oops! That is NOT how we want the room to look (although I’m pretty sure this is very accurate when we have 2 toddlers wandering around). That was the look of the room pre-cleaning and post-electrical work.

This is much better. This is the view from the door to the cribs:

Nursery Room Layout - Doyle Dispatch

 

Looking at the cribs from the other corner (where the glider will be):

Nursery Room Layout - Doyle Dispatch

From the attic walk-up:

Nursery Room Layout - Doyle Dispatch

From the window alcove, looking at the cribs (left) and the changing table wall (right):

Nursery Room Layout - Doyle Dispatch

We now have a room full of furniture, painted walls, and decoration. Stay tuned to more Make it Mondays for more DIY updates from our nautical nursery!

*Part of the mood board and layout posts originally appeared on Dory’s blog “Doyle Dispatch.” To read more posts about Dory’s pregnancy and nursery decorating on her blog, you can see the list here.*

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